Structure and Dynamics of Macromolecules: Absorption and Fluorescence Studies

Elsevier
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Structure and Dynamics of Macromolecules: Absorption and Fluorescence Studies is clearly written and contains invaluable examples, coupled with illustrations that demonstrate a comprehensible analysis and presentation of the data. This book offers practical information on the fundamentals of absorption and fluorescence, showing that it is possible to interpret the same result in different ways. It is an asset to students, professors and researchers wishing to discover or use absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and to scientists working on the structure and dynamics of macromolecules.

* Offers concise information on the fundamentals of absorption and fluorescence
* Critically reviews examples taken from previously published literature
* Highly illustrated, it is suitable for academic and institutional libraries and government laboratories
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Additional Information

Publisher
Elsevier
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Published on
Aug 30, 2011
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Pages
426
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ISBN
9780080474489
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Chemistry / Analytic
Science / Chemistry / Physical & Theoretical
Science / Physics / Crystallography
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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X-ray fluorescence spectrometry has been an established, widely practiced method of instrumental chemical analysis for about 30 years. However, although many colleges and universities offer full-semester courses in optical spectrometric methods of instrumental analysis and in x-ray dif fraction, very few offer full courses in x-ray spectrometric analysis. Those courses that are given are at the graduate level. Consequently, proficiency in this method must still be acquired by: self-instruction; on-the-job training and experience; "workshops" held by the x-ray instrument manu facturers; the one- or two-week summer courses offered by a few uni versities; and certain university courses in analytical and clinical chemistry, metallurgy, mineralogy. geology, ceramics. etc. that devote a small portion of their time to applications of x-ray spectrometry to those respective disciplines. Moreover, with all due respect to the books on x-ray spectrometric analysis now in print, in my opinion none is really suitable as a text or manual for beginners in the discipline. In 1968, when I undertook the writing of the first edition of my previous book, Principles and Practice of X-Ray Spectrometric Analysis,* my objective was to provide a student text. However, when all the material was compiled, I decided to provide a more comprehensive book, which was also lacking at that time. Although that book explains principles, instrumentation, and methods at the begin ner's level, this material is distributed throughout a mass of detail and more advanced material.
This is the third edition of the Index of Crystallographic Supplies prepared on behalf of the International Union of Crystallography by its Commission on Crystallographic Apparatus. The first was compiled by Professor A. Guinier in 1956 and the second under the editorship of Dr. A. J. Rose in 1959. At that time, it was intended that publication of revised editions of the Index should be a continuing project of succeeding Commissions. However, with changing membership and other pressing activities, the preparation of the third edition has been dependent on the acquisition of a Commission member with appropriate experience and enthusiasm. The Commission is therefore fortunate that Professor R. Rudman, who has had considerable experience in the collation of information on crystallographic matters, has undertaken this task. He has been assisted by the advice of the members of the 1969-72 Commission, in particular that of a group which, during a meeting in Marseille, France, July 4-6, 1971 to discuss Commission affairs, went over the draft of the Index in close detail. These included S. C. Abrahams, U. W. Arndt and D. M. Kheiker. The information included in the Index was gathered from replies to a questionnaire which was sent to a wide range of manufacturers and suppliers throughout the world. It is not intended as complete and exhaustive but it should provide a convenient starting point for the location of the appropriate sources of equipment and materials of use to crystallographers.
Luminescence, for example, as fluorescence, bioluminescence, and phosphorescence, can result from chemical changes, electrical energy, subatomic motions, reactions in crystals, or stimulation of an atomic system. This subject continues to have a major technological role for humankind in the form of applications such as organic and inorganic light emitters for flat panel and flexible displays such as plasma displays, LCD displays, and OLED displays.

Luminescent Materials and Applications describes a wide range of materials and applications that are of current interest including organic light emitting materials and devices, inorganic light emitting diode materials and devices, down-conversion materials, nanomaterials, and powder and thin-film electroluminescent phosphor materials and devices. In addition, both the physics and the materials aspects of the field of solid-state luminescence are presented. Thus, the book may be used as a reference to gain an understanding of various types and mechanisms of luminescence and of the implementation of luminescence into practical devices.

The book is aimed at postgraduate students (physicists, electrical engineers, chemical engineers, materials scientists, and engineers) and researchers in industry, for example, at lighting and display companies and academia involved in studying conduction in solids and electronic materials. It will also provide an excellent starting point for all scientists interested in luminescent materials. Finally it is hoped that this book will not only educate, but also stimulate further progress in this rapidly evolving field.
One of the most fascinating scientific detective stories of the last fifty years, an exciting quest for a new form of matter. The Second Kind of Impossible reads like James Gleick’s Chaos combined with an Indiana Jones adventure.

When leading Princeton physicist Paul Steinhardt began working in the 1980s, scientists thought they knew all the conceivable forms of matter. The Second Kind of Impossible is the story of Steinhardt’s thirty-five-year-long quest to challenge conventional wisdom. It begins with a curious geometric pattern that inspires two theoretical physicists to propose a radically new type of matter—one that raises the possibility of new materials with never before seen properties, but that violates laws set in stone for centuries. Steinhardt dubs this new form of matter “quasicrystal.” The rest of the scientific community calls it simply impossible.

The Second Kind of Impossible captures Steinhardt’s scientific odyssey as it unfolds over decades, first to prove viability, and then to pursue his wildest conjecture—that nature made quasicrystals long before humans discovered them. Along the way, his team encounters clandestine collectors, corrupt scientists, secret diaries, international smugglers, and KGB agents. Their quest culminates in a daring expedition to a distant corner of the Earth, in pursuit of tiny fragments of a meteorite forged at the birth of the solar system.

Steinhardt’s discoveries chart a new direction in science. They not only change our ideas about patterns and matter, but also reveal new truths about the processes that shaped our solar system. The underlying science is important, simple, and beautiful—and Steinhardt’s firsthand account is an engaging scientific thriller.
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