Class and Power in Sudan: The Dynamics of Sudanese Politics, 1898-1985

SUNY Press
1
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With the attention of the industrialized world focused on the political, economic, and social strife of Africa, Tim Niblock travels to Sudan for a first-hand investigation of the socio-economic structure of that continent’s largest country. His findings hold significant implications for the wider context of Africa, the Arab countries, and the Third World. His is a systematic and comprehensive study of Sudanese politics. A country with immense economic potential, possessing extensive tracts of cultivable but currently uncultivated land, Sudan could emerge as a major source of food for the Arab world. Yet it is threatened by famine while attempts at development are frustrated by civil war and political disarray. Niblock examines the political, economic, and social factors that have shaped the country’s development. The fate of Sudan will be critical to the political stability of North-East Africa and the Red Sea area, and the Sudanese experience is instructive for underdeveloped countries as a whole.
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About the author

Tim Niblock is a Lecturer in Politics at the University of Exeter.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Pages
370
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ISBN
9781438414669
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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