Energy Accounts: Architectural Representations of Energy, Climate, and the Future

Free sample

How does one tell the story of energy production, use, or conservation in a manner sufficiently convincing to influence policy, behavior, and design? Energy Accounts explores potential answers to this question through compelling images, data visualizations, narratives, and other examples of accounting for energy. Organized into a collection containing both examples of best practices and critiques, this impressive array of projects and contributors combines text and graphic material to explore different representations of energy data. Including work from Kieran Timberlake, SHoP, AMO, Lateral Office, WOHA, and many more, the book boasts a unique graphic design which supports and enhances its role as a valuable resource for professionals and students in architecture, engineering, and urban design.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Dan Willis is a practicing architect and Professor of Architecture at Penn State University. His research and writing focus on the intersection of architecture and technology. He is the author of The Emerald City and Other Essays on the Architectural Imagination, and co-editor and contributor to Architecture and Energy: Performance and Style.

William W. Braham is a Professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. His recent publications include Architecture and Systems Ecology: Thermodynamic Principles for Environmental Building Design, in three parts (2015) and as co-editor of Architecture and Energy: Performance and Style (2013).

Katsuhiko Muramoto is an Associate Professor of Architecture at Penn State University. His research focuses on cross-cultural issues between the West and Japan, twentieth-century Japanese architecture, theory of new media and digital mediation, cyber-enabled participatory collaboration, mobile augmented reality, and theories of architectural representation.

Daniel A. Barber is an Assistant Professor of Architecture at Penn Design. He is an architectural historian with a research interest in the relationship between the design fields and the emergence of global environmental culture across the twentieth century. He is a leading voice in the field’s increasing interest in environmental concerns on both historical and theoretical terms.

Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Jun 23, 2016
Read more
Collapse
Pages
290
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781317428770
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Architecture / Design, Drafting, Drawing & Presentation
Architecture / General
Architecture / Professional Practice
Architecture / Sustainability & Green Design
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
The Fully Updated, Indispensible Study of Sustainable Design Principles

Fundamentals of Integrated Design for Sustainable Building is the first textbook to merge principles, theory, and practice into an integrated workflow. This book introduces the technologies and processes of sustainable design and shows how to incorporate sustainable concepts at every design stage. This comprehensive primer takes an active learning approach that keeps students engaged.

This book dispenses essential information from practicing industry specialists to provide a comprehensive introduction to the future of design. This new second edition includes:

Expansive knowledge—from history and philosophy to technology and practice Fully updated international codes, like the CAL code, and current legislations Up-to-date global practices, such as the tools used for Life-Cycle Assessment Thorough coverage of critical issues such as climate change, resiliency, health, and net zero energy building Extensive design problems, research exercise, study questions, team projects, and discussion questions that get students truly involved with the material

Sustainable design is a responsible, forward-thinking method for building the best structure possible in the most efficient way. Conventional resources are depleting and building professionals are thinking farther ahead. This means that sustainable design will eventually be the new standard and everyone in the field must be familiar with the concepts to stay relevant. Fundamentals of Integrated Design for Sustainable Building is the ideal primer, with complete coverage of the most up to date information.

Modern buildings are both wasteful machines that can be made more efficient and instruments of the massive, metropolitan system engendered by the power of high-quality fuels. A comprehensive method of environmental design must reconcile the techniques of efficient building design with the radical urban and economic reorganization that we face. Over the coming century, we will be challenged to return to the renewable resource base of the eighteenth-century city with the knowledge, technologies, and expectations of the twenty-first-century metropolis.

This book explores the architectural implications of systems ecology, which extends the principles of thermodynamics from the nineteenth-century focus on more efficient machinery to the contemporary concern with the resilient self-organization of ecosystems.

Written with enough technical material to explain the methods, it does not include in-text equations or calculations, relying instead on the energy system diagrams to convey the argument. Architecture and Systems Ecology has minimal technical jargon and an emphasis on intelligible design conclusions, making it suitable for architecture students and professionals who are engaged with the fundamental issues faced by sustainable design.

The energy systems language provides a holistic context for the many kinds of performance already evaluated in architecture—from energy use to material selection and even the choice of building style. It establishes the foundation for environmental principles of design that embrace the full complexity of our current situation. Architecture succeeds best when it helps shape, accommodate, and represent new ways of living together.

FEW TECHNOLOGICAL ACHIEVEMENTS are as impressive as the ability to see our own planet from outer space. The beautiful sphere suspended against the black void of space makes plain the bond that the billions of us on Earth have in common.

This global consciousness inspires space travellers who then provide emotional and spiritual observations. Their views from outer space awaken them to a grand realization that all who share our planet make up a single community. They think this viewpoint will help unite the nations of the world in order to build a peaceful future for the present generation and the ones that follow.

Many poets, philosophers, and writers have criticized the artificial borders that separate people preoccupied with the notion of nationhood. Despite the visions and hopes of astronauts, poets, writers, and visionaries, the reality is that nations are continuously at war with one another, and poverty and hunger prevail in many places throughout the world, including the United States.

So far, no astronaut arriving back on Earth with this new social consciousness has pro- posed to transcend the world's limitations with a world where no national boundaries exist. Each remains loyal to his/her particular nation-state, and doesn’t venture beyond patriotism - "my country, right or wrong" – because doing so may risk their positions.

Most problems we face in the world today are of our own making. We must accept that the future depends upon us. Interventions by mythical or divine characters in white robes descending from the clouds, or by visitors from other worlds, are illusions that cannot solve the problems of our modern world. The future of the world is our responsibility and depends upon decisions we make today. We are our own salvation or damnation. The shape and solutions of the future depend totally on the collective effort of all people working together.


A House in the Sun describes a number of experiments in solar house heating in American architectural, engineering, political, economic, and corporate contexts from the beginning of World War II until the late 1950s. Houses were built across the Midwest, Northeast, and Southwestern United States, and also proposed for sites in India, South Africa, and Morocco. These experiments developed in parallel to transformations in the discussion of modern architecture, relying on new materials and design ideas for both energy efficiency and claims to cultural relevance. Architects were among the myriad cultural and scientific actors to see the solar house as an important designed element of the American future. These experiments also developed as part of a wider analysis of the globe as an interconnected geophysical system. Perceived resource limitations in the immediate postwar period led to new understandings of the relationship between energy, technology and economy. The solar house - both as a charged object in the milieu of suburban expansion, and as a means to raise the standard of living in developing economies - became an important site for social, technological, and design experimentation. This led to new forms of expertise in architecture and other professions. Daniel Barber argues that this mid-century interest in solar energy was one of the first episodes in which resource limitations were seen as an opportunity for design to attain new relevance for potential social and cultural transformations. Furthermore, the solar discussion established both an intellectual framework and a funding structure for the articulation of and response to global environmental concerns in subsequent decades. In presenting evidence of resource tensions at the beginning of the Cold War, the book offers a new perspective on the histories of architecture, technology, and environmentalism, one more fully entangled with the often competing dynamics of geopolitical and geophysical pressures.
The present AutoCAD reference guide is, basically, an extension of our teaching, training and working experience in the CAD (Computer Aided Design) field and covers only ~200 commands of AutoCAD. In a productivity war, not only fewer weapons (tools and commands) force us to imbibe the defeat, but more than enough weapons are also suicidal (because we have less time for selection of weapon, too). So a compromising balance has been tried to achieve the optimum.

The available average good books on AutoCAD are horribly containing 2-3 thousands of pages for main text, with dozens of pages, only for their contents. All these mess is full of unnecessary details of even very simpler commands, which user can easily learn intuitively. Even after the bulk of pages they skip some really useful commands, which could otherwise boost the productivity of end user. 

While this reference guide is intended to provide a compact guide of AutoCAD to a wide range of working CAD professionals and students, ranging from engineering streams (architectural, civil, mechanical, electrical, etc.) to non-technical streams. We are relying heavily on the AutoCAD’s user friendly interface while writing the reference guide, as after entering the command alias in AutoCAD, it,  itself, tells ‘n asks for minimum ‘n necessary details through command line. So, practically, there is no need of written procedural details.

As this reference guide book is complimentary with the ‘AutoCAD-Advanced’ and ‘AutoCAD-Professional’ courses of ‘4Dimensions’, most commands given in this guide need at least one time lab training on real projects by an experienced tutor/professional. Each command, once mastered, doesn’t need the whole procedure to be remembered exactly (as different versions may have different procedures).


Content Development Team

4 Dimensions


©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.