Greek Concept of Nature, The: The Politics of Theory-Building and Pedagogy in Composition

SUNY Press
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In The Greek Concept of Nature, Gerard Naddaf utilizes historical, mythological, and linguistic perspectives to reconstruct the origin and evolution of the Greek concept of phusis. Usually translated as nature, phusis has been decisive both for the early history of philosophy and for its subsequent development. However, there is a considerable amount of controversy on what the earliest philosophers—Anaximander, Xenophanes, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, Parmenides, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, Leucippus, and Democritus—actually had in mind when they spoke of phusis or nature. Naddaf demonstrates that the fundamental and etymological meaning of the word refers to the whole process of birth to maturity. He argues that the use of phusis in the famous expression Peri phuseos or historia peri phuseos refers to the origin and the growth of the universe from beginning to end. Naddaf’s bold and original theory for the genesis of Greek philosophy demonstrates that archaic and mythological schemes were at the origin of the philosophical representations, but also that cosmogony, anthropogony, and politogony were never totally separated in early Greek philosophy.
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About the author

Gerard Naddaf is Professor of Philosophy at York University in Toronto. He is the coauthor (with Dirk L. Couprie and Robert Hahn) of Anaximander in Context: New Studies in the Origins of Greek Philosophy, also published by SUNY Press, and the translator and editor of Plato the Myth Maker by Luc Brisson.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Feb 1, 2012
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Pages
265
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ISBN
9780791483671
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Ancient / Greece
Literary Criticism / Ancient & Classical
Philosophy / History & Surveys / Ancient & Classical
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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