Ten Lectures on the Interface Between Analytic Number Theory and Harmonic Analysis

Mathematical Surveys and Monographs

Book 84
American Mathematical Soc.
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This book contains lectures presented by Hugh L. Montgomery at the NSF-CBMS Regional Conference held at Kansas State University in May 1990. The book focuses on important topics in analytic number theory that involve ideas from harmonic analysis. One valuable aspect of the book is that it collects material that was either unpublished or that had appeared only in the research literature. This book would be an excellent resource for harmonic analysts interested in moving into research in analytic number theory. In addition, it is suitable as a textbook in an advanced graduate topics course in number theory.
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Publisher
American Mathematical Soc.
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Pages
220
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ISBN
9780821889282
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English
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Mathematics / General
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This book focuses on the analysis of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions that describe singularities of solutions to elliptic boundary value problems in domains with corners and edges. The authors treat both classical problems of mathematical physics and general elliptic boundary value problems. The volume is divided into two parts: The first is devoted to the power-logarithmic singularities of solutions to classical boundary value problems of mathematical physics. The second deals with similar singularities for higher order elliptic equations and systems. Chapter 1 collects basic facts concerning operator pencils acting in a pair of Hilbert spaces. Related properties of ordinary differential equations with constant operator coefficients are discussed and connections with the theory of general elliptic boundary value problems in domains with conic vertices are outlined. New results are presented. Chapter 2 treats the Laplace operator as a starting point and a model for the subsequent study of angular and conic singularities of solutions. Chapter 3 considers the Dirichlet boundary condition beginning with the plane case and turning to the space problems. Chapter 4 investigates some mixed boundary conditions. The Stokes system is discussed in Chapters 5 and 6, and Chapter 7 concludes with the Dirichlet problem for the polyharmonic operator. Chapter 8 studies the Dirichlet problem for general elliptic differential equations of order $2m$ in an angle. In Chapter 9, an asymptotic formula for the distribution of eigenvalues of operator pencils corresponding to general elliptic boundary value problems in an angle is obtained. Chapters 10 and 11 discuss the Dirichlet problem for elliptic systems of differential equations of order $2$ in an $n$-dimensional cone. Chapter 12 studies the Neumann problem for general elliptic systems, in particular with eigenvalues of the corresponding operator pencil in the strip $\mid {\Re} \lambda - m + /2n \mid \leq 1/2$. It is shown that only integer numbers contained in this strip are eigenvalues. Applications are placed within chapter introductions and as special sections at the end of chapters. Prerequisites include standard PDE and functional analysis courses.
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