Capital Cities: Varieties and Patterns of Development and Relocation

Routledge
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The issue of capital city relocation is a topic of debate for more than forty countries across the world. In this first book to discuss the issue, Vadim Rossman offers an in-depth analysis of the subject, highlighting the global trends and the key factors that motivate different countries to consider such projects, analyzing the outcomes and drawing lessons from recent capital city transfers worldwide for governments and policy-makers.

Capital Cities studies the approaches and the methodologies that inform such decisions and debates. Special attention is given to the study of the universal patterns of relocation and patterns specific to particular continents and mega-regions and particular political regimes. The study emphasizes the role of capital city transfers in the context of nation- and state-building and offers a new framework for thinking about capital cities, identifying six strategies that drive these decisions, representing the economic, political, geographic, cultural and security considerations.

Confronting the popular hyper-critical attitudes towards new designed capital cities, Vadim Rossman shows the complex motives that underlie the proposals and the important role that new capitals might play in conflict resolution in the context of ethnic, religious and regional rivalries and federalist transformations of the state, and is seeking to identify the success and failure factors and more efficient implementation strategies. Drawing upon the insights from spatial economics, comparative federalist studies, urban planning and architectural criticism, the book also traces the evolution of the concept of the capital city, showing that the design, iconography and the location of the capital city play a critical role in the success and the viability of the state.

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About the author

Vadim Rossman

is a social scientist and independent consultant. He has lived and taught in the United States, Russia, Israel, Southeast Asia and Central Europe. He is currently a Professor at the Higher School of Economics (HSE) in St Petersburg, Russia. Originally trained as a political philosopher and sinologist, he has published on a broad range of topics, including nation building, nationalism and ultra-nationalism, post-communism, geopolitics, European and Russian intellectual history, and urban studies. Vadim holds a PhD from the University of Texas at Austin and Master's degrees from the Lomonosov Moscow State University and the McCombs School of Business. He is currently working on establishing a consulting practice in the field of capital city relocations to deliver strategic guidance to world governments and other stakeholders.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Mar 12, 2018
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Pages
318
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ISBN
9781317562849
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / Urban & Land Use Planning
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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LONGLISTED FOR THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN NONFICTION

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