The Life and Truth of George R. Stewart: A Literary Biography of the Author of Earth Abides

McFarland
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Best known for his 1949 post-apocalyptic thriller Earth Abides, George R. Stewart (1895–1980) spent a lifetime wandering the American landscape and writing books about its geography and history. An English professor at the University of California at Berkeley, the exceptional scholar-author penned some of the most remarkable literary works of the 20th century, inventing several types of books along the way—including the road-geography book, micro-history, place-name history, ecological history, and the ecological novel. By weaving human and natural sciences and history into his books Stewart created works with a multi-disciplinary perspective on events and places that influenced numerous other writers, artists, and scientists, including Stephen King, Greg Bear, and Page Stegner. This volume considers George R. Stewart’s rich oeuvre while chronicling a life-long quest to uncover the deepest truths about the man and his work.
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About the author

Donald M. Scott has taught in high schools, adult schools, and in community college. He has worked as a National Park Ranger-Naturalist in national parks and served as a NASA aerospace educational representative where he worked with NASA astronauts and scientists to develop educational programs, which he presented to students and teachers. His home base is in Arroyo Grande, California, but he travels extensively as a volunteer in parks.
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Additional Information

Publisher
McFarland
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Published on
Sep 18, 2012
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Pages
246
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ISBN
9780786490530
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Literary Criticism / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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