From Comparison to World Literature

SUNY Press
Free sample

Reintroduces the concept of “world literature” in a truly global context, transcending past Eurocentrism.

The study of world literature is on the rise. Until recently, the term “world literature” was a misnomer in comparative literature scholarship, which typically focused on Western literature in European languages. In an increasingly globalized era, this is beginning to change. In this collection of essays, Zhang Longxi discusses how we can transcend Eurocentrism or any other ethnocentrism and revisit the concept of world literature from a truly global perspective. Zhang considers literary works and critical insights from Chinese and other non-Western traditions, drawing on scholarship from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, and integrating a variety of approaches and perspectives from both East and West. The rise of world literature emerges as an exciting new approach to literary studies as Zhang argues for the validity of cross-cultural understanding, particularly from the perspective of East-West comparative studies.
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About the author

Zhang Longxi is Chair Professor of Comparative Literature and Translation at the City University of Hong Kong. He is the author of several books, including Unexpected Affinities: Reading across Cultures and Allegoresis: Reading Canonical Literature East and West.
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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Nov 19, 2014
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Pages
202
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ISBN
9781438454726
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Criticism / Asian / Chinese
Literary Criticism / Books & Reading
Literary Criticism / European / General
Literary Criticism / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Originally published in 1990.

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