Historic Spots in California: Fifth Edition, Edition 5

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The only complete guide to the historical landmarks of California, this standard work has now been thoroughly revised and updated. The edition is enriched by some 200 photographs, most of which were taken by the reviser and all of which are new to this edition.

Since the last revision in 1990, enormous changes have taken place within the state: many landscapes and buildings have been greatly altered and some are no longer in existence. Every effort has been made, through personal observation, to record the present condition of the landmarks and to provide clear and accurate descriptions of their locations. The text is written with the idea that the reader might use the book while traveling around the state, and thus mileage and signposts have been given where it was thought helpful. For this new edition, the reviser has added additional information on the state's geography, the presence of Native Americans, and state and local museums.

To provide historical background, the reviser has written a short historical overview. The chapters of the book are organized by county, in alphabetical order. A rough chronology is followed for each county, beginning with pertinent facts on geography, continuing with Native American life, the coming of the Spaniards and other Europeans, the American conquest of the 1840s, and, in those areas where it had a major impact, the gold rush. The text then continues into the period of intensive agricultural development, railroads, industrialization, the growth of cities, the effects of World War II, and on into more recent times.

The bibliography, like the text, has been updated to 2001 and includes some of the established classics in California history as well as more recent material.

Reviews of the Fourth Edition

"Prodigious in detail and scope, this is the definitive guide to historical landmarks in California and a valuable resource not only for travelers but also for anyone interested in California history." —California Highways

"This is an outstanding and accessible piece of scholarship, one that every student of California will value." —San Francisco Chronicle

"Kyle and Stanford University Press are to be lauded for this monumental undertaking." —Southern California Quarterly

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About the author

Douglas E. Kyle, who also revised the fourth edition, taught history and political science at Merritt College, Oakland, for almost forty years before his retirement.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Stanford University Press
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Published on
Sep 6, 2002
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Pages
688
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ISBN
9780804778176
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / State & Local / General
History / United States / State & Local / West (AK, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, UT, WY)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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