Retrofitting Suburbia, Updated Edition: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs

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Updated with a new Introduction by the authors and a foreword by Richard Florida, this book is a comprehensive guide book for urban designers, planners, architects, developers, environmentalists, and community leaders that illustrates how existing suburban developments can be redesigned into more urban and more sustainable places. While there has been considerable attention by practitioners and academics to development in urban cores and new neighborhoods on the periphery of cities, there has been little attention to the redesign and redevelopment of existing suburbs. The authors, both architects and noted experts on the subject, show how development in existing suburbs can absorb new growth and evolve in relation to changed demographic, technological, and economic conditions.

Retrofitting Suburbia was named winner in the Architecture & Urban Planning category of the 2009 American Publishers Awards for Professional and Scholarly Excellence (The PROSE Awards) awarded by The Professional and Scholarly Publishing (PSP) Division of the Association of American Publishers

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About the author

Ellen Dunham-Jones, AIA, is professor of architecture and urban design in the College of Architecture at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. An award-winning registered architect, she has published extensively on urban design and criticism and is on the board of directors of the Congress for the New Urbanism.

June Williamson, LEED AP, is associate professor of architecture at The City College of New York. A registered architect, she has contributed to numerous urban design projects. Her writing has been published in numerous journals and, in 2010, she conceived the design competition "Build a Better Burb."

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Mar 23, 2011
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Pages
288
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ISBN
9781118027677
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / General
Architecture / Urban & Land Use Planning
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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