Foucault, Cultural Studies, and Governmentality

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Applies Foucault's ideas to a cultural studies framework.

Offering new and unique approaches bridging the gap between cultural analysis and governmentality studies in the United States, this book opens up new lines of inquiry into cultural practices and offers fresh perspectives on Foucault’s writings and their implications for cultural studies. It provides critical frameworks to analyze cultural practices and strategies of governing as ways of understanding the present. It also broadens the theater of intellectual debates over “culture and governing” studies from their current locales in Australia and Great Britain to the United States.

"I see this as an important addition to the debates on how to read culture because it suggests lines of thinking that will be of interest to many scholars who, like myself, are approaching these questions from different angles." — Rosemary Hennessy, author of Profit and Pleasure: Sexual Identities in Late Capitalism

"This book is intriguing in that it takes on varied issues of contemporary interest and importance. It will be useful to people doing work within and across several disciplines and in public policy making." — Erin Mitchell, State University of New York at Plattsburgh

Contributors include Tony Bennett, Jack Z. Bratich, Mary Coffey, Greg Dimitriadis, Lawrence Grossberg, James Hay, Lisa King, Samantha J. King, Cameron McCarthy, Shawn Miklaucic, Toby Miller, Jeremy Packer, Carrie A. Rentschler, and Jonathan Sterne.
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About the author

Jack Z. Bratich is Assistant Professor of Communication at the University of New Hampshire. Jeremy Packer is Assistant Professor of Communications at Penn State at University Park. Cameron McCarthy is Research Professor of Communications and Professor of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of The Uses of Culture: Education and the Limits of Ethnic Affiliation.
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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Feb 1, 2002
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Pages
377
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ISBN
9780791487112
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / Cultural Policy
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / Popular Culture
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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While Americans prize the ability to get behind the wheel and hit the open road, they have not always agreed on what constitutes safe, decorous driving or who is capable of it. Mobility without Mayhem is a lively cultural history of America’s fear of and fascination with driving, from the mid-twentieth century to the present. Jeremy Packer analyzes how driving has been understood by experts, imagined by citizens, regulated by traffic laws, governed through education and propaganda, and represented in films, television, magazines, and newspapers. Whether considering motorcycles as symbols of rebellion and angst, or the role of CB radio in regulating driving and in truckers’ evasions of those regulations, Packer shows that ideas about safe versus risky driving often have had less to do with real dangers than with drivers’ identities.

Packer focuses on cultural figures that have been singled out as particularly dangerous. Women drivers, hot-rodders, bikers, hitchhikers, truckers, those who “drive while black,” and road ragers have all been targets of fear. As Packer debunks claims about the dangers posed by each figure, he exposes biases against marginalized populations, anxieties about social change, and commercial and political desires to profit by fomenting fear. Certain populations have been labeled as dangerous or deviant, he argues, to legitimize monitoring and regulation and, ultimately, to curtail access to automotive mobility. Packer reveals how the boundary between personal freedom and social constraint is continually renegotiated in discussions about safe, proper driving.

A New York Times Bestseller


Mark Zuckerberg, Chris Christie, and Cory Booker were ready to reform our failing schools. They got an education.

When Mark Zuckerberg announced to a cheering Oprah audience his $100 million pledge to transform the downtrodden schools of Newark, New Jersey, then mayor Cory Booker and Governor Chris Christie were beside him, vowing to help make Newark “a symbol of educational excellence for the whole nation.” But their plans soon ran into the city’s seasoned education players, fierce protectors of their billion-dollar-a-year system. It’s a prize that, for generations, has enriched seemingly everyone, except Newark’s children. 

Dale Russakoff delivers a riveting drama of our times, encompassing the rise of celebrity politics, big philanthropy, extreme economic inequality, the charter school movement, and the struggles and triumphs of schools in one of the nation’s poorest cities. As Cory Booker navigates between his status as “rock star mayor” on Oprah’s stage and object of considerable distrust at home, the tumultuous changes planned by reformers and their highly paid consultants spark a fiery grass-roots opposition stoked by local politicians and union leaders.  The growth of charters forces the hand of Newark’s school superintendent Cami Anderson, who closes, consolidates, or redesigns more than a third of the city’s schools—a scenario on the horizon for many urban districts across America. 
Russakoff provides a close-up view of twenty-six-year-old Mark Zuckerberg and his wife as they decide to give the immense sum of money to Newark and then experience an education of their own amid the fallout of the reforms. Most moving are Russakoff’s portraits from inside classrooms, as homegrown teachers and principals battle heroically to reach students damaged by extreme poverty and violence. 

The Prize is an absorbing portrait of a titanic struggle, indispensable for anyone who cares about the future of public education and the nation’s children.

 
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