Sometime Connection, The: Public Opinion and Social Policy

SUNY Press
Free sample

The Sometime Connection introduces a variety of theoretical perspectives on the connection between public opinion and policy and applies them to six social policy topics: abortion, affirmative action, welfare, Social Security, corrections, and pornography. The book provides complete policy histories, information on trends in public opinion, and a diagnosis of the role that public opinion has played in the development of policy for each of the six topics discussed.
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About the author

Elaine B. Sharp is Professor of Political Science at the University of Kansas. She is the author of several books, including Culture Wars and City Politics; The Dilemma of Drug Policy; Urban Politics and Administration; and Citizen Demand-Making in the Urban Context.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Pages
289
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ISBN
9781438419695
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Policy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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