Manhunts: A Philosophical History

Princeton University Press
Free sample

Touching on issues of power, authority, and domination, Manhunts takes an in-depth look at the hunting of humans in the West, from ancient Sparta, through the Middle Ages, to the modern practices of chasing undocumented migrants. Incorporating historical events and philosophical reflection, Grégoire Chamayou examines the systematic and organized search for individuals and small groups on the run because they have defied authority, committed crimes, seemed dangerous simply for existing, or been categorized as subhuman or dispensable.

Chamayou begins in ancient Greece, where young Spartans hunted and killed Helots (Sparta's serfs) as an initiation rite, and where Aristotle and other philosophers helped to justify raids to capture and enslave foreigners by creating the concept of natural slaves. He discusses the hunt for heretics in the Middle Ages; New World natives in the early modern period; vagrants, Jews, criminals, and runaway slaves in other eras; and illegal immigrants today. Exploring evolving ideas about the human and the subhuman, what we owe to enemies and people on the margins of society, and the supposed legitimacy of domination, Chamayou shows that the hunting of humans should not be treated ahistorically, and that manhunting has varied as widely in its justifications and aims as in its practices. He investigates the psychology of manhunting, noting that many people, from bounty hunters to Balzac, have written about the thrill of hunting when the prey is equally intelligent and cunning.

An unconventional history on an unconventional subject, Manhunts is an in-depth consideration of the dynamics of an age-old form of violence.

Read more

About the author

Grégoire Chamayou is a research scholar in philosophy at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris.
Read more

Reviews

Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
Read more
Published on
Jul 22, 2012
Read more
Pages
232
Read more
ISBN
9781400842254
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
History / Social History
History / World
Philosophy / Ethics & Moral Philosophy
Philosophy / History & Surveys / General
Philosophy / Political
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Grégoire Chamayou
Drone warfare has raised profound ethical and constitutional questions both in the halls of Congress and among the U.S. public. Not since debates over nuclear warfare has American military strategy been the subject of discussion in living rooms, classrooms, and houses of worship. Yet as this groundbreaking new work shows, the full implications of drones have barely been addressed in the recent media storm.

In a unique take on a subject that has grabbed headlines and is consuming billions of taxpayer dollars each year, philosopher Grégoire Chamayou applies the lens of philosophy to our understanding of how drones are changing our world. For the first time in history, a state has claimed the right to wage war across a mobile battlefield that potentially spans the globe. Remote-control flying weapons, he argues, take us well beyond even George W. Bush’s justification for the war on terror.

What we are seeing is a fundamental transformation of the laws of war that have defined military conflict as between combatants. As more and more drones are launched into battle, war now has the potential to transform into a realm of secretive, targeted assassinations of individuals—beyond the view and control not only of potential enemies but also of citizens of democracies themselves. Far more than a simple technology, Chamayou shows, drones are profoundly influencing what it means for a democracy to wage war. A Theory of the Drone will be essential reading for all who care about this important question.

Bertrand Russell
Hailed as “lucid and magisterial” by The Observer, this book is universally acclaimed as the outstanding one-volume work on the subject of Western philosophy.

Considered to be one of the most important philosophical works of all time, the History of Western Philosophy is a dazzlingly unique exploration of the ideologies of significant philosophers throughout the ages—from Plato and Aristotle through to Spinoza, Kant and the twentieth century. Written by a man who changed the history of philosophy himself, this is an account that has never been rivaled since its first publication over sixty years ago.

Since its first publication in 1945, Lord Russell’s A History of Western Philosophy is still unparalleled in its comprehensiveness, its clarity, its erudition, its grace, and its wit. In seventy-six chapters he traces philosophy from the rise of Greek civilization to the emergence of logical analysis in the twentieth century.

Among the philosophers considered are: Pythagoras, Heraclitus, Parmenides, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, the Atomists, Protagoras, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Cynics, the Sceptics, the Epicureans, the Stoics, Plotinus, Ambrose, Jerome, Augustine, Benedict, Gregory the Great, John the Scot, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, William of Occam, Machiavelli, Erasmus, More, Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, the Utilitarians, Marx, Bergson, James, Dewey, and lastly the philosophers with whom Lord Russell himself is most closely associated—Cantor, Frege, and Whitehead, coauthor with Russell of the monumental Principia Mathematica.
Grégoire Chamayou
Drone warfare has raised profound ethical and constitutional questions both in the halls of Congress and among the U.S. public. Not since debates over nuclear warfare has American military strategy been the subject of discussion in living rooms, classrooms, and houses of worship. Yet as this groundbreaking new work shows, the full implications of drones have barely been addressed in the recent media storm.

In a unique take on a subject that has grabbed headlines and is consuming billions of taxpayer dollars each year, philosopher Grégoire Chamayou applies the lens of philosophy to our understanding of how drones are changing our world. For the first time in history, a state has claimed the right to wage war across a mobile battlefield that potentially spans the globe. Remote-control flying weapons, he argues, take us well beyond even George W. Bush’s justification for the war on terror.

What we are seeing is a fundamental transformation of the laws of war that have defined military conflict as between combatants. As more and more drones are launched into battle, war now has the potential to transform into a realm of secretive, targeted assassinations of individuals—beyond the view and control not only of potential enemies but also of citizens of democracies themselves. Far more than a simple technology, Chamayou shows, drones are profoundly influencing what it means for a democracy to wage war. A Theory of the Drone will be essential reading for all who care about this important question.

Grégoire Chamayou
 «¡Qué buen blanco! Voy a tratar de ir por detrás para tenerlo bien en la mira». Esta frase no la pronuncia un piloto de un avión de combate, sino alguien cómodamente instalado en una base militar de Nevada, alguien que teledirige un dron que está a punto de lanzar un misil Hellfire contra un grupo de sospechosos en Afganistán. Esta novedosa forma de violencia supone eliminar el cara a cara y replantearse, de este modo, ciertos conceptos: ¿cómo definir a un combatiente sin combate?, ¿dónde está el campo de batalla?, ¿podemos hablar de guerra si el riesgo no es recíproco y ciertos grupos humanos son reducidos al estado de blancos potenciales a la espera de devenir legítimos¡Qué buen blanco! Voy a tratar de ir por detrás para tenerlo bien en la mira». Esta frase no la pronuncia un piloto de un avión de combate, sino alguien cómodamente instalado en una base militar de Nevada, alguien que teledirige un dron que está a punto de lanzar un misil Hellfire contra un grupo de sospechosos en Afganistán. Esta novedosa forma de violencia supone eliminar el cara a cara y replantearse, de este modo, ciertos conceptos: ¿cómo definir a un combatiente sin combate?, ¿dónde está el campo de batalla?, ¿podemos hablar de guerra si el riesgo no es recíproco y ciertos grupos humanos son reducidos al estado de blancos potenciales a la espera de devenir legítimos?
El dron es un instrumento militar de violencia a distancia, que puede moverse sin ser visto, golpear sin ser alcanzado y poner en riesgo vidas sin arriesgar la de quien dispara, motivo por el cual sus seguidores lo consideran el arma más ética. Esta conversión moral es la base de los planteamientos de los filósofos estadounidenses e israelíes que intentan trabajar en el campo de la ética militar. Su trabajo es esencial para asegurar la aceptación social y política de esta arma.

Teoría del dron, ganador del English Pen Award y traducido a más de 15 idiomas, es un ensayo brillante sobre las implicaciones éticas, psicológicas, jurídicas y políticas de esta inquietante tecnología militareoría del dron, ganador del English Pen Award y traducido a más de 15 idiomas, es un ensayo brillante sobre las implicaciones éticas, psicológicas, jurídicas y políticas de esta inquietante tecnología militar. 
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.