Learning Across Sites: New Tools, Infrastructures and Practices

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The ever evolving, technology-intensive nature of the twenty-first century workplace has caused an acceleration in the division of labour, whereby work practices are becoming highly specialised and learning and the communication of knowledge is in a constant state of flux. This poses a challenge for education and learning: as knowledge and expertise increasingly evolve, how can individuals be prepared through education to participate in specific industries and organisations, both as newcomers and throughout their careers?

Learning Across Sites brings together a diverse range of contributions from leading international researchers to examine the impacts and roles which evolving digital technologies have on our navigation of education and professional work environments. Viewing learning as a socially organised activity, the contributors explore the evolution of learning technologies and knowledge acquisition in networked societies through empirical research in a range of industries and workplaces. The areas of study include public administration, engineering, production, and healthcare and the contributions address the following questions:

  • How are learning activities organised?
  • How are tools and infrastructures used?
  • What competences are needed to participate in specialised activities?
  • What counts as knowledge in multiple and diverse settings?
  • Where can parallels be drawn between workplaces?

Addressing an emerging problem of adaptation in contemporary education, this book is essential reading for all those undertaking postgraduate study and research in the fields of educational psychology, informatics and applied information technology.

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About the author

Sten Ludvigsen is Professor at InterMedia, University of Oslo. His research interests focus on how digital learning resources are used and how relationships work in distributed settings, both in education and in the workplace.

Andreas Lund is Associate Professor at the Department of Teacher Education and School Development, University of Oslo. He has experience of teaching in high schools and his research interests include technology-mediated collective thinking and the pedagogical and technological co-design of learning environments.

Ingvill Rasmussen is currently undertaking a post-doctorate position at InterMedia, University of Oslo. Her research interests are learning and change connected to the use of computer technology in educational settings.

Roger Säljö is Professor of Education and Psychology of Education, University of Gothenburg. His research interests include learning, interaction and development in a sociocultural perspective.

With contributions from:-

Jerry Andriessen, Department of Educational Sciences, Research Centre Learning in Interaction, Utrecht University, Netherlands

Michael Baker, CNRS & University Paris X, France

Sally Barnes, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, UK

Charles Crook, Learning Sciences Research Institute, School of Education, University of Nottingham, UK

Olga Dysthe, Department of Education, University of Bergen, Norway

Anne Edwards, Department of Education, University of Oxford, UK

Ann-Charlotte Eklund, LinCS, Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Yrjö Engeström, Center for Research on Activity, Development and Learning, University of Helsinki, Finland

Ola Erstad, Institute for educational research, University of Oslo, Norway

Julia Gillen, Literacy Research Centre, Lancaster University, UK

Reuma de Groot, The School of Education, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Kai Hakkarainen, Center for Research on Activity, Development and Learning, University of Helsinki, Finland

Trond Eiliv Hauge, Department of Teacher Education and School Development, University of Oslo, Norway

Tarja-Riitta Hurme, Department of Educational Sciences and Teacher Education, University of Oulu, Finland

Jonas Ivarson, Department of Education, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Sanna Järvelä, Department of Educational Sciences and Teacher Education, University of Oulu, Finland

Hanna Järvenoja, Department of Educational Sciences and Teacher Education, University of Oulu, Finland

Ingeborg Krange, InterMedia, University of Oslo, Norway

Maarten De Laat, Institute of Education, Utrecht University, Netherlands

Leif Christian Lahn, Institute for educational research, University of Oslo, Norway

Jiri Lallimo, Center for Research on Activity, Development and Learning, University of Helsinki, Finland

Minna Lakkala, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland

Sølvi Lillejord, Department of Education, University of Bergen, Norway

Oscar Lindwall, Department of Education, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Karen Littleton, Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology, The Open University, UK

Sten Ludvigsen, InterMedia, University of Oslo, Norway

Andreas Lund, InterMedia, University of Oslo, Norway

Åsa Mäkitalo, LinCS, Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Neil Mercer, Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, UK

David Middleton, Loughborough University, UK

Anne Moen, InterMedia, University of Oslo, Norway

Anders Morch, InterMedia, University of Oslo, Norway

Hanni Muukkonen, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland

Sami Paavola, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland

Jean-Francois Perret, Institute of Psychology and Education, University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland

Anne- Nelly Perret-Clermont, Institute of Psychology and Education, University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland

Ingvill Rasmussen, InterMedia, University of Oslo, Norway

Roger Säljö, LinCS, Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Baruch Schwarz, The School of Education, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Mari Ann Skaanes, Depsrtment of Informatics, University of Oslo, Norway

Judith Kleine Staarman, Graduate School of Education, University of Exeter, UK

Gerry Stahl, College of Information Science and Technology, Drexel University, USA

Rosamunde Sutherland, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, UK

Seppo Toika, Center for Research on Activity, Development and Learning, University of Helsinki, Finland

Hanna Toiviainen, Center for Research on Activity, Development and Learning, University of Helsinki, Finland

Alison Twiner, Faculty of Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK

Chiel Van der Puil, Department of Educational Sciences, Utrecht University, Netherlands

Arne Vines, Department of Education, University of Bergen, Norway

Barbara Wasson, Department of Information Science and Media Studies, University of Bergen, Norway

Rupert Wegerif, Graduate School of Education, University of Exeter, UK

Hal White, Center for Research on Activity, Development and Learning, University of Helsinki, Finland

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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Oct 4, 2010
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Pages
388
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ISBN
9781136943911
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Computers & Technology
Education / Educational Psychology
Education / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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In the twenty-first century, being able to collaborate effectively is important at all ages, in everyday life, education and work, within and across diverse cultural settings. People are increasingly linked by networks that are not only means for working and learning together, but are also ways of maintaining social and emotional support. Collaborating with others requires not only elaborating new ideas together, but also being able to manage interpersonal relations. In order to design and facilitate effective collaborative situations, the challenge is therefore to understand the interrelations between social, affective and cognitive dimensions of interactions in groups.

Affective Learning Together

contains in-depth theoretical reviews and case studies of group learning in a variety of educational situations and taught disciplines, from small groups working in the secondary school classroom, to teams of medical students and more informal working groups at university level. Contributors provide detailed analyses of the dynamics of interpersonal relations and affects, in relation with processes of meaning and knowledge elaboration, including discussion of:

the variety of social learning situations and experiences;

social identities in group learning;

emotion, motivation and knowledge elaboration;

conflict, arguments and interpersonal tensions in group learning.

Bringing together a broad range of contributions from internationally recognised researchers who are seeking to broaden, deepen and integrate the field of research on collaborative learning, this book is essential reading for all serious students of contemporary educational research and practice.

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