Understanding Modern Warfare

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A major study of the theory and practice of warfare in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Using relevant examples from recent history, this book provides a complete introduction to the issues, ideas, concepts, context and vocabulary of modern warfare. The expert team of authors explore the conduct of war across land, sea, air and space in addition to addressing key issues relating to contemporary strategy, weapons of mass destruction and irregular warfare, including insurgency, terrorism and civil war. They provide an incisive and structured grounding in military theory and argue for the importance of understanding warfare within the joint (inter-service) context and as an evolutionary rather than a revolutionary phenomenon. By providing the tools required to truly understand contemporary military doctrine this accessible survey will be an invaluable resource for any student of military history or international relations as well as for military professionals.
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About the author

David Jordan is a Senior Lecturer in the Defence Studies Department, King College London, at the Joint Services Command and Staff College, Shrivenham. His previous publications include Battle of the Bulge (2003) and The Fall of Hitler Reich: Germany Defeat in Europe, 19435 (2004).

James D. Kiras is Associate Professor at the School of Advanced Air and Space Studies, Air University, United States Air Force. He is the author of Special Operations and Strategy: From World War II to the War on Terrorism (2006) and was awarded The Air Education Training Command civilian ducator of the Yearward for 2006.

David J. Lonsdale is a Lecturer in Strategic Studies at the University of Hull. His publications include The Nature of War in the Information Age: Clausewitzian Future (2004) and Alexander the Great: Lessons in Strategy (2007).

Ian Speller is a Lecturer in the Department of History at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth. He also lectures in defence studies at the Irish Defence Forces Military College and in maritime strategy at the UK Defence Academy and at the National Maritime College of Ireland. He is the author of The Role of Amphibious Warfare in British Defence Policy, 19456 (2001) and the editor of The Royal Navy and Maritime Power in the Twentieth Century (2005).

Christopher Tuck is a Lecturer in the Defence Studies Department, King College London, based at the Joint Services Command and Staff College, Shrivenham. He co-authored, with Ian Speller, Amphibious Warfare: The Theory and Practice of Amphibious Warfare in the Twentieth Century (2001).

C. Dale Walton is a Lecturer in International Relations and Strategic Studies at the University of Reading. Among his publications are The Myth of Inevitable US Defeat in Vietnam (2002) and Geopolitics and the Great Powers in the Twenty-First Century (2007).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
Sep 18, 2008
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Pages
392
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ISBN
9781107717725
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / General
Political Science / International Relations / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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This book explores the role played by civilians in shaping the outcomes of military combat across time and place.

This volume explores the contributions civilians have made to warfare in case studies that range from ancient Europe to contemporary Africa and Latin America. Building on philosophical and legal scholarship, it explores the blurred boundary between combatant and civilian in different historical contexts and examines how the absence of clear demarcations shapes civilian strategic positioning and impacts civilian vulnerability to military targeting and massacre. The book argues that engagement with the blurred boundaries between combatant and non-combatant both advance the key analytical questions that underpin the historical literature on civilians and underline the centrality of civilians to a full understanding of warfare. The volume provides new insight into why civilian death and suffering has been so common, despite widespread beliefs embedded in legal and military codes across time and place that killing civilians is wrong. Ultimately, the case studies in the book show that civilians, while always victims of war, were nevertheless often able to become empowered agents in defending their own lives, and impacting the outcomes of wars. By highlighting civilian military agency and broadening the sense of which actors affect strategic outcomes, the book also contributes to a richer understanding of war itself.

This book will be of much interest to students of military studies, international history, international relations and war and conflict studies.

Stephen E. Ambrose’s iconic New York Times bestseller about the ordinary men who became the World War II’s most extraordinary soldiers: Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, US Army.

They came together, citizen soldiers, in the summer of 1942, drawn to Airborne by the $50 monthly bonus and a desire to be better than the other guy. And at its peak—in Holland and the Ardennes—Easy Company was as good a rifle company as any in the world.

From the rigorous training in Georgia in 1942 to the disbanding in 1945, Stephen E. Ambrose tells the story of this remarkable company. In combat, the reward for a job well done is the next tough assignment, and as they advanced through Europe, the men of Easy kept getting the tough assignments.

They parachuted into France early D-Day morning and knocked out a battery of four 105 mm cannon looking down Utah Beach; they parachuted into Holland during the Arnhem campaign; they were the Battered Bastards of the Bastion of Bastogne, brought in to hold the line, although surrounded, in the Battle of the Bulge; and then they spearheaded the counteroffensive. Finally, they captured Hitler's Bavarian outpost, his Eagle's Nest at Berchtesgaden.

They were rough-and-ready guys, battered by the Depression, mistrustful and suspicious. They drank too much French wine, looted too many German cameras and watches, and fought too often with other GIs. But in training and combat they learned selflessness and found the closest brotherhood they ever knew. They discovered that in war, men who loved life would give their lives for them.

This is the story of the men who fought, of the martinet they hated who trained them well, and of the captain they loved who led them. E Company was a company of men who went hungry, froze, and died for each other, a company that took 150 percent casualties, a company where the Purple Heart was not a medal—it was a badge of office.
This new and updated edition of Understanding Naval Warfare offers the reader an accessible introduction to the study of modern naval warfare, providing a thorough grounding in the vocabulary, concepts, issues, and debates, set within the context of relevant history.

Navies operate in an environment that most people do not understand and that many avoid. They are equipped with a bewildering range of ships, craft and other vessels and types of equipment, the purpose of which is often unclear. Writings on naval warfare are usually replete with references to esoteric concepts explained in specialist language than can serve as a barrier to understanding. The objective of this book, therefore, is to cut through the obscure and the arcane to offer a clear, coherent and accessible guide to the key features of naval warfare which will equip the reader with the knowledge and understanding necessary for a sophisticated engagement with the subject.

This second edition is divided into two key parts. The first focuses on concepts of naval warfare and introduces readers to the ideas associated with the theory and practice of naval operations. It also includes a new chapter in which the history of the last century of naval warfare is explored in order to illustrate the key concepts. The second part focuses on the conduct of war at sea and on peacetime roles for contemporary navies. This latter section concludes with a chapter that looks ahead to the likely future of naval warfare.

This textbook will be essential reading for students of naval warfare, sea power and maritime security, and highly recommended for those studying military history, strategic studies and security studies in general.

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