Working-class Women in the Academy: Laborers in the Knowledge Factory

Univ of Massachusetts Press
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"My mother still wants me to get a 'real' job. My father, who is retired after forty-four years in the merchant marine, has never read my work. When I visited recently, the only book in his house was the telephone book." "I do not know that my mother's mother ever acknowledged my college education except to ask me once, 'How can you live so far away from your people?'. Thus write two of the twenty women from working-class backgrounds whose voices are heard in this unique collection of essays. Each of the women has lived through the process of academic socialization - as both student and teacher - and each has thought long and deeply about her experience from an explicitly feminist perspective. Among the questions the contributors explore, What are the issues - pedagogical, theoretical, and personal - that affect the professional and private lives of these women? How do they resolve tensions between their roles as middle-class professionals and their roots in working-class families? How do class and gender intersect in the academy?
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Additional Information

Publisher
Univ of Massachusetts Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 1993
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Pages
335
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ISBN
9780870238352
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Higher
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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This ground-breaking collection features the diverse voices, experiences, and scholarship of cross-cultural women of American Indian, Asian American, Black/African American and Hispanic descent at various levels of academe, actively engaged in the advancement of marginalized groups in the U.S. and abroad through their scholarly work. Intergenerational cross-cultural scholars manifest a literary community that models ways in which women scholars can move beyond traditional institutional, psychological, and professional barriers to practice activism, break unwritten rules, and shatter status quo ‘business as usual’ practices in the academy. This distinctive volume exemplifies the phenomenon of cross-cultural women scholars conducting research and writing about ways in which they negotiate their professional realities toward professional goal attainment. Each chapter presents rigorous ethnographic research complemented by critical analyses, reflecting ways in which these self-determined scholars transcend barriers associated with the dynamic intersections of race, gender, ethnicity, class and language in higher education. Scholars share strategies for institutional, psychological, and professional barrier transcendence through various approaches such as educational leadership for equity, the practice of cross-cultural competence, various mentoring interactions, and the creation of and participation in networking groups with other women of color in academe. Students, academics, educational practitioners and individuals seeking exemplars for ethnographic research will find this critical book essential as a means for better informing their scholarship.
Something is going wrong on many college campuses in the last few years. Rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide are rising. Speakers are shouted down. Students and professors say they are walking on eggshells and afraid to speak honestly. How did this happen?
 
First Amendment expert Greg Lukianoff and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt show how the new problems on campus have their origins in three terrible ideas that have become increasingly woven into American childhood and education: what doesn’t kill you makes you weaker; always trust your feelings; and life is a battle between good people and evil people. These three Great Untruths are incompatible with basic psychological principles, as well as ancient wisdom from many cultures. They interfere with healthy development. Anyone who embraces these untruths—and the resulting culture of safetyism—is less likely to become an autonomous adult able to navigate the bumpy road of life.
 
Lukianoff and Haidt investigate the many social trends that have intersected to produce these untruths. They situate the conflicts on campus in the context of America’s rapidly rising political polarization, including a rise in hate crimes and off-campus provocation. They explore changes in childhood including the rise of fearful parenting, the decline of unsupervised play, and the new world of social media that has engulfed teenagers in the last decade.
 
This is a book for anyone who is confused by what is happening on college campuses today, or has children, or is concerned about the growing inability of Americans to live, work, and cooperate across party lines.
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