These Bones Shall Rise Again: Selected Writings on Early China

SUNY Press
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David N. Keightley’s seminal essays on the origins of Chinese society are brought together in one volume.

These Bones Shall Rise Again brings together in one volume many of David N. Keightley’s seminal essays on the origins of early Chinese civilization. Written over a period of three decades and accessible to the non-specialist, these essays provide a wealth of information and insights on the Shang dynasty, traditionally dated 1766–1122 or 1056 BCE. Of all the eras of Chinese history, the Shang has been a particularly elusive one, long considered more myth than reality. A historian with a keen appreciation for anthropology and archaeology, Keightley has given us many descriptions of Shang life. Best known for his analysis of oracle bones, he has looked beyond the bones themselves and expanded his historical vision to ponder the lives of those who used them. What did the Shang diviner think he was doing? The temerity to ask such questions and the insights they have provided have been provocative and, at times, controversial. Equally intriguing have been Keightley’s assertions that many of the distinctive features of Chinese civilization were already in evidence during the Shang, 3000 years ago. In this collection, readers will find not only an essential reference but also the best kind of thought-provoking scholarship.
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About the author

David N. Keightley is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of The Ancestral Landscape: Time, Space, and Community in Late Shang China (ca. 1200-1045 B.C.) and Sources of Shang History: The Oracle-Bone Inscriptions of Bronze Age China, and the editor of The Origins of Chinese Civilization. Henry Rosemont Jr. is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at St. Mary’s College of Maryland and currently Visiting Scholar of Religious Studies at Brown University. His books include Rationality and Religious Experience: The Continuing Relevance of the World’s Spiritual Traditions and, with Roger T. Ames, The Chinese Classic of Family Reverence: A Philosophical Translation of the Xiaojing.
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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Aug 13, 2014
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Pages
358
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ISBN
9781438447483
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Asia / China
Philosophy / Eastern
Religion / Eastern
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / Archaeology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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