Serbia's Great War, 1914-1918

Purdue University Press
2
Free Sample

Mitrovic's volume fills the gap in Balkan history by presenting an in-depth look at Serbia and its role in WWI. The Serbian experience was in fact of major significance in this war. In the interlocking development of the wartime continent, Serbia's plight is part of a European jigsaw. Also, the First World War was crucial as a stage in the construction of Serbian national mythology in the twentieth century.
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About the author

Andrej Mitrovic; is Chair and Professor of Modern History at the University of Belgrade. He has written widely on the First World War and the Paris Peace Conference, on interwar Europe, and is the author of books and articles on economic, social, and cultural history and on historiography. He received the prestigious Herder Prize from the University of Vienna and the Alfred Toepfer Foundation of Hamburg, Germany in 2001. In 2004 Germany's Southeast Europe Association awarded him the Konstantin Jiricek Medal.
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Additional information

Publisher
Purdue University Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2007
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Pages
386
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ISBN
9781557534767
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Eastern
History / Europe / General
History / Military / Wars & Conflicts (Other)
History / Military / World War I
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Prior to the outbreak of the Great War in 1914, the Castle Point District was made up of four very quaint, peaceful little parishes: Canvey Island, South Benfleet, Hadleigh and Thundersley. The initial enthusiasm shown by the young men of this area, who were enthusiastic to be part of an adventure that was to be ïover by ChristmasÍ, was mirrored by thousands of other courageous young men around Britain. Most understood that it was their sworn duty to stand up for their king and country. They didnÍt stop to think or even fully appreciate the hardship and fear they would leave behind on the home front. This book tells of the memories and recollections of some of these brave men who were fortunate enough to return home to their friends and families. For the ones who werenÍt so lucky, we hear from the people who endured the pain of a love lost forever more. Included throughout are a collection of invaluable wartime newspaper reports that recount daily life, telling of the sacrifices that those left behind had to endure whilst reading about the war dead, their numbers increasing on an almost daily basis. From the extraordinary role of women during the war, the conscientious objectors and those exempt from the fighting, to the aftermath of war when the district celebrated victory while dealing with the painful loss of 189 men, all aspects of wartime Castle Point are covered in this remarkable account, interspersed with a number of wartime poems that further explain in verse what life was like during these dark days.
Winner of the 2015 Norman B. Tomlinson, Jr. Book Prize

Serbia and the Balkan Front, 1914 is the first history of the Great War to address in-depth the crucial events of 1914 as they played out on the Balkan Front. James Lyon demonstrates how blame for the war's outbreak can be placed squarely on Austria-Hungary's expansionist plans and internal political tensions, Serbian nationalism, South Slav aspirations, the unresolved Eastern Question, and a political assassination sponsored by renegade elements within Serbia's security services. In doing so, he portrays the background and events of the Sarajevo Assassination and the subsequent military campaigns and diplomacy on the Balkan Front during 1914.

The book details the first battle of the First World War, the first Allied victory and the massive military humiliations Austria-Hungary suffered at the hands of tiny Serbia, while discussing the oversized strategic role Serbia played for the Allies during 1914. Lyon challenges existing historiography that contends the Habsburg Army was ill-prepared for war and shows that the Dual Monarchy was in fact superior in manpower and technology to the Serbian Army, thus laying blame on Austria-Hungary's military leadership rather than on its state of readiness.

Based on archival sources from Belgrade, Sarajevo and Vienna and using never-before-seen material to discuss secret negotiations between Turkey and Belgrade to carve up Albania, Serbia's desertion epidemic, its near-surrender to Austria-Hungary in November 1914, and how Serbia became the first belligerent to openly proclaim its war aims, Serbia and the Balkan Front, 1914 enriches our understanding of the outbreak of the war and Serbia's role in modern Europe. It is of great importance to students and scholars of the history of the First World War as well as military, diplomatic and modern European history.
Filled with fresh interpretations and information, puncturing old myths and challenging new ones, Battle Cry of Freedom will unquestionably become the standard one-volume history of the Civil War. James McPherson's fast-paced narrative fully integrates the political, social, and military events that crowded the two decades from the outbreak of one war in Mexico to the ending of another at Appomattox. Packed with drama and analytical insight, the book vividly recounts the momentous episodes that preceded the Civil War--the Dred Scott decision, the Lincoln-Douglas debates, John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry--and then moves into a masterful chronicle of the war itself--the battles, the strategic maneuvering on both sides, the politics, and the personalities. Particularly notable are McPherson's new views on such matters as the slavery expansion issue in the 1850s, the origins of the Republican Party, the causes of secession, internal dissent and anti-war opposition in the North and the South, and the reasons for the Union's victory. The book's title refers to the sentiments that informed both the Northern and Southern views of the conflict: the South seceded in the name of that freedom of self-determination and self-government for which their fathers had fought in 1776, while the North stood fast in defense of the Union founded by those fathers as the bulwark of American liberty. Eventually, the North had to grapple with the underlying cause of the war--slavery--and adopt a policy of emancipation as a second war aim. This "new birth of freedom," as Lincoln called it, constitutes the proudest legacy of America's bloodiest conflict. This authoritative volume makes sense of that vast and confusing "second American Revolution" we call the Civil War, a war that transformed a nation and expanded our heritage of liberty.
“An important account of a very overlooked aspect of the Great War.” —Strategy Page
 
With the transfer of German units to the western front in the spring of 1918, the position of the Central Powers on the Macedonian front worsened. Materiel became scarce and morale among the Bulgarian forces deteriorated. The Entente Command perceived in Macedonia an excellent opportunity to apply additional pressure to the Germans, who were already retreating on the western front. In September, Entente forces undertook an offensive directed primarily at Bulgarian defenses at Dobro Pole. Balkan Breakthrough tells the story of that battle and its consequences. Dobro Pole was the catalyst for the collapse of the Central Powers and the Entente victory in southeastern Europe―a defeat that helped persuade the German military leadership that the war was lost. While decisive in ending World War I in the region, the battle did not resolve the underlying national issues there.
 
“[Hall’s] recreation of the morale crisis that eroded the fighting capability of the Bulgarian Army generally, and underlay its collapse at Dobro Pole and afterward, is a welcome addition to the history of a largely ignored front of the First World War.” —International History Review
 
“Incredibly rich . . . well written, and thoroughly researched. For those unfamiliar with the critical role of the Balkans in World War I historiography, this will be an extremely useful introduction.” —Graydon Tunstall, University of South Florida
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