How to Use Numbers in Conversation

English Daily Use

Book 9
Manik Joshi
2
Free sample

How to use numbers correctly when writing, writing numbers in English sentences, use of numbers in English conversation | use of numbers in daily English | Types of Numbers, Standard words for numbers, Various expressions, structure (1) ---- multiple number [in the beginning or middle of the sentence], structure (2) ---- multiple number + of + noun, structure (3) ---- multiple number + of + noun + of, structure (4) ---- multiple number (less) + of + multiple number (more), structure (5) ---- multiple number (less) + of + multiple number (more) + of + noun, structure (6) ---- multiple number + and + multiple number, structure (7) ---- number + times, structure (8) ---- half/double/twice/thrice/fraction, structure (09) ---- number + as many + (noun, etc. + as), structure (10) ---- as much (as), structure (11) ---- number + ‘as likely’ or ‘more likely’


Sample This:

Structure (1) -- Multiple Number [In the Beginning or Middle of Sentence]

Hundreds gathered in front of the parliament building early on Monday.
Hundreds injured in two days of clashes.
Thousands evacuated after explosions at munitions depot.
Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of Cubans and Haitians have lost their lives at sea seeking freedom and opportunity.

Millions marched against government in over 400 cities.
Industry produced several hundred million units a year.
Exact loss of the property is not yet known but rough estimates put the losses to ten million dollars.
More than three million Australians lack access to critical financial services.
Trillions dong spent to build ports which have been left idle.
Trillions will need to be spent on infrastructure very soon.
Agriculture and tourism are a trillion dollar economy.
Mobiles are a multi-trillion-dollar industry, even bigger than pharmaceuticals.
It would add more than a trillion dollars to the economy every year.
There are spiral galaxies out there with more than a trillion stars, and giant elliptical galaxies with 100 trillion stars.
Our inability to comprehend the sheer magnitude of 1 billion has been eclipsed by our inability to comprehend 1 trillion.
Global loss to fraud ran into trillions.
She said she would have donated most of her $4 trillion to charity.
The universe is estimated to be somewhere between 13 billion to 14 billion years old.


Structure (2) -- Multiple Number + of + Noun

2-A. HUNDREDS OF
Hundreds of stocks saw much more dramatic gains.
Hundreds of new jobs were being created every year.
Hundreds of homes destroyed in wildfires.
Hundreds of police officers had taken off their bullet-proof vests.
Hundreds of students participated in the competition.
Hundreds of wannabe leaders are roaming our streets.
Hundreds of candidates were standing for parliamentary elections.
Hundreds of angry residents surrounded the police post to protest against the incident and demanded the arrest of the culprits.
Hundreds of railway officials would be deployed to manage the smooth running of special trains.
Hundreds of residents remained without electricity and water Monday evening.
Hundreds of riot police continued to fire tear gas and jets of water during the agitation.
Hundreds of protestors from a wide variety of activist groups staged protests.
He has received hundreds of awards.
Stories behind these and the hundreds of other Asian bus accidents are same.
He was welcomed to University by hundreds of students and fans.
The flames torched hundreds of homes now.
The explosion killed 15 people and destroyed or damaged hundreds of homes.
Medical laboratory admitted to paying bribes to hundreds of doctors in the city.
Many have walked hundreds of miles fleeing fighting in the capital.
Just one severe typhoon could leave behind hundreds of people dead.
Wildfires fueled by hot, gusty winds were burning hundreds of acres and forcing evacuations.
He posted hundreds of messages on a public Internet forum.
The process will involve hundreds of community meetings.
There's little sense in having hundreds of followers who don't know what you do.
Every year, hundreds of people across the country get infected with contagious diseases.
He had hundreds of hats which were on display at the museum.
There are hundreds of young writers in India.
What about the hundreds of illegal refineries 'discovered' every day?
The Corps of Engineers operates hundreds of reservoirs across the nation.
We found maps of hundreds of houses.
Heavy rainfall, cloud bursts, landslides and floods have caused widespread loss of life and property displacing hundreds of people.
The fire has wiped out hundreds of homes.
The police raid left hundreds of protesters injured.
A squall line is a line of thunderstorms that extend for hundreds of miles.
Police detained hundreds of illegal migrants.
Many hundreds of fun activities exist on each Hawaiian Island.

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About the author

Manik Joshi was born on Jan 26, 1979 at Ranikhet and is permanent resident of Haldwani, Kumaon zone of India. He is an Internet Marketer by profession. He is interested in domaining (business of buying and selling domain names), web designing (creating websites), and various online jobs (including 'self book publishing'). He is science graduate with ZBC (zoology, botany, and chemistry) subjects. He is also an MBA (with specialization in marketing). He has done three diploma courses in computer too.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Manik Joshi
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Published on
Oct 25, 2014
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Pages
40
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ISBN
9781492742159
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Public Speaking
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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This Book Covers The Following Topics:
 
Structure (1a) ---- Comparison of Actions - I
Structure (1b) ---- Comparison of Actions - II
Structure (2a) ---- Comparison of Qualities - I
Structure (2b) ---- Comparison of Qualities - II
Structure (3a) ---- Specific Similarity – Quality Adjectives
Structure (3b) ---- Specific Similarity – Quality Nouns
Structure (4) ---- Comparison of Number/Quantity
Structure (5a) ---- As + Much/Many, etc. + Word/Words + As
Structure (5b) ---- Comparative Estimates – Multiple Numbers
Structure (6) ---- Parallel Increase or Decrease / Gradual Increase
Structure (7) ---- Illogical Comparatives
Structure (8) ---- General Similarity and Difference
Structure (9) ---- Using Word ‘Compare’ or ‘Comparison’
Structure (10) ---- Comparison Degrees
10a. Regular and Irregular Forms of Adjectives
10b. Interchange of Positive and Comparative Degrees
10c. Interchange of Positive and Superlative Degrees
10d. Interchange of Comparative and Superlative Degrees
10e. Interchange of Positive, Comparative and Superlative Degrees
EXERCISE – 1
EXERCISE – 2

Sample This:

Structure (1a) ---- Comparison of Actions - I

PATTERN 1:
AFFIRMATIVE SENTENCE
-ING form of Verb + Verb ‘Be’ + As + Adjective + As + -ING form of Verb
Or
It + Verb ‘Be’ + As + Adjective + To + Ordinary Verb + As + Ordinary Verb

Writing is as easy as thinking.
Jogging is as easy as exercising.
Closing is as easy as opening.
Designing is as easy as publishing.

It is as easy to write as think.
It is as easy to jog as exercise.
It is as easy to close as open.
It is as easy to design as publish.


PATTERN 2:
NEGATIVE SENTENCE
-ING form of Verb + Verb ‘To Be’ + Not + As + Adjective + As + -ING form of Verb
Or
It + Verb ‘To Be’ + Not + As + Adjective + To + Ordinary Verb + As + Ordinary Verb

Studying is not as easy as playing.
Swimming is not as easy as running.
Singing is not as easy as talking.
Reading is not as easy as listening.

It is not as easy to study as play.
It is not as easy to swim as run.
It is not as easy to sing as talk.
It is not as easy to read as listen.


Structure (1b) ---- Comparison of Actions - II

PATTERN
(A). Prefer/Would Prefer + -ING form of Verb + To + -ING form of Verb, OR
(B). Prefer/Would Prefer + To + Ordinary Verb + Rather Than + Ordinary Verb, OR
(C). Had Better/Had Rather/Had Sooner/Would Rather/Would Sooner + Ordinary Verb + Than + Ordinary Verb

Example 1:
I prefer studying to playing.
I would prefer studying to playing.

I prefer to study rather than play.
I would prefer to study rather than play.

I had better study than play.
I had rather study than play.
I had sooner study than play.
I would rather study than play.
I would sooner study than play.

Example 2:
You prefer writing to talking.
You would prefer writing to talking.

You prefer to write rather than talk.
You would prefer to write rather than talk.

You had better write than talk.
You had rather write than talk.
You had sooner write than talk.
You would rather write than talk.
You would sooner write than talk.
This Book Covers The Following Topics:

1. AS---AS
1A. AS EARLY AS
1B. AS FAR AS
1C. AS LONG AS
1D. AS MANY AS
1E. AS MUCH AS
1F. AS SOON AS
1G. AS WELL AS
2. EITHER---OR
3. NEITHER---NOR
4. WHETHER---OR
5. BARELY/HARDLY/SCARCELY---WHEN
6. NO SOONER---THAN
7. RATHER---THAN
8. NOT ONLY---BUT ALSO
9. ALTHOUGH---YET
10. TOO---TO
11. BETWEEN---AND
12. BOTH---AND
13. SO THAT
14. UNLESS
15. UNTIL
16. OTHERS
Exercises: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercises: 2(A) and 2(B)
Exercises: 3(A) and 3(B)


Sample This:

1. AS---AS

Correlative Words connect words, phrases, and clauses. They are generally used in the form of pair of words.

As -- As
This Pattern Is Used When You Are Comparing or Linking Two People Or Things, Or Two Situations

EXAMPLES:
AS EARLY AS
AS FAR AS
AS LONG AS
AS MANY AS
AS MUCH AS
AS SOON AS
AS WELL AS


1A. AS EARLY AS
‘As Early As’ Is Used To Show --
Done Before the Expected, Usual or Planned Time

Elections will be held as early as possible.
As early as 7:30 a.m. on Sunday, he was surprised to see the policemen.
Companies could announce the agreement as early as Tuesday.
Given their importance, it makes sense to nurture good values in children as early as possible.
I woke up as early as 4 a.m.
International sanctions on it could start to be lifted as early as spring next year.
We demand that the government acts firmly and culprits are booked as early as possible.
Latest refund mechanism facility will help its customers get refunds as early as within 24 hours of returning the product.
Our company is looking to invest in Australia as early as next year.
Reserve Bank will cut interest rates again, possibly as early as this month.
Scores of people visit the beaches of East Coast Road as early as 5 a.m. for their daily exercises.
Company is in process to complete the audit as early as possible and will submit the audited financial results in due course of time.
Government planned to overhaul the corporate debt market by pushing all issuance onto an electronic platform as early as November.
She could return to China as early as this month, the media reported on Tuesday.
She had as early as 1815 directed that the state should settle the entire cost of education of its people.
A special report is scheduled to be released as early as this month.
First signs of global warming felt as early as 1940s.
Forecasters predicted national capital could experience sub-zero temperatures as early as next month.
Street clearance in the areas surrounding the art museum is scheduled to begin as early as Sunday at 6:00 p.m.
This year's flu outbreak can happen as early as October and can last as late as May.
Tropical Storm Erika was expected to hit the Southeast as early as Sunday.
Government should make sure that construction of the college starts as early as possible.
Police commissioner is all set to complete the probe into the case as early as possible.
The Centre today asked the states to take steps in making special courts functional as early as possible.
School principal wanted all files as early as possible.
About 100 people lined up outside security barricades as early as 3 a.m.
This Book Covers The Following Topics:

Active and Passive Voice
Interchange of Active and Passive Voice
1. First or Second Form of Verb
2. Auxiliary Verb ‘Be’ + -ING Form of Verb
3. Have/Has/Had + Past Participle
4. Present/Future Modals + Verb Word
5. Past Modals + Past Participle
6. Verb + Preposition
7. Main Verb + Object + Complement
8. Main Verb + Object + Object
9. Have/Has/Had + Infinitive (To + Verb)
10. Auxiliary Verb ‘Be’ + Infinitive (To + Verb)
11. Verb + Object + Infinitive (Without ‘To’)
12. There + Verb ‘Be’ + Noun + Infinitive
13. Interrogative Sentences
14. Imperative Sentences
15. Principal Clause + That + Noun Clause (Object)
16. Verb followed by --ING form or an Infinitive
17. Use of Prepositions
18. The Passive With Get
19. Middle Voice
Exercise -- 01
Exercise -- 02
Exercise -- 03

Sample This:

VOICE - Definition
Voice refers to the form of a verb that shows whether the subject of a sentence performs the action or is affected by it.

ACTIVE VOICE - Definition
The form of a verb in which subject is the person or thing that performs the action.
Example:
They finished the work.
[subject -- “they”, verb -- “finished”, object -- “work”]
In this sentence, the subject (they) acts on the object (work).

Other Examples:
The teacher praises him.
She posted the letter.
I buy new books.
We will celebrate his birthday.

PASSIVE VOICE - Definition
The form of a verb in which subject is affected by the action of the verb.
Important Note -- The object of the active voice becomes the subject in the passive voice.
Example:
The work was finished by them.
[subject -- “work”, passive verb -- “was finished”, object -- “them”]
In this example, the subject (work) is not the doer; it is being acted upon by the doer ‘them’)

Other Examples:
He is praised by the teacher.
The letter was posted by her
New books are bought by me.
His birthday will be celebrated by us.


WHEN TO USE PASSIVE VOICE
(1). You should use passive voice when you do not know the active subject.
(2). When you want to make the active object more important.
(3). When active subject is obvious.
(4). When you want to emphasize the action of the sentence rather than the doer of the action.
(5). Passive voice is frequently used to describe scientific or mechanical processes
(6). Passive voice is often used in news reports:
(7). When active voice does not sound good.
(8). When you want to make more polite or formal statements.
(9). You can use passive voice to avoid responsibility.
(10). You can also use passive voice for sentence variety in your writing.
(11). You can also use passive voice when you want to avoid extra-long subjects.

Changing Active Voice Into Passive Voice
Rule 1:
Move the object of the active voice into the position of subject (front of the sentence) in the passive voice. And move the subject of the active voice into the position of object in the passive voice.

Rule 2:
Passive voice needs a helping verb to express the action. Put the helping verb in the same tense as the original active sentence. The main verb of the active voice is always changed into past participle (third form of verb) in different ways.

Rule 3:
Place the active sentence's subject into a phrase beginning with the preposition ‘by’.

Rule 4:
If the object in an active voice sentence is a pronoun (me, us, you, him, her, they, it), it changes in passive voice sentence as follows:
me -- I; us -- we; you -- you; him -- he; her -- she; them -- they; it – it

Rule 5:
Subject- Verb Agreement
Make the first verb agree with the new subject in passive voice.

Rule 6:
When there are two objects (direct object and indirect object), only one object is interchanged. The second object remains unchanged.

Following Tenses Cannot Be Changed Into Passive Voice:
1. Present Perfect Continuous Tense
2. Past Perfect Continuous Tense
3. Future Continuous Tense
4. Future Perfect Continuous Tense
This Book Covers The Following Topics:

What is “Repetition of Words”?
Structure (1) ---- Word + and + Word
Structure (2) ---- Comparative + and + Comparative
Structure (3) ---- Word + after + Word
Structure (4) ---- Word + by + Word
Structure (5) ---- Word + to + Word
Structure (6) ---- Word + on/upon + Word
Structure (7) ---- Word + against/of/for/in/with + Word
Structure (8) ---- The more, less, etc…, the more, less, etc…
Structure (9) ---- Combination of the Same Words
Structure (10) ---- Repetition of Various Words
Structure (11) ---- Repetition of Words More than Once
Structure (12) ---- Repetition of ‘Group of Words’
Structure (13) ---- Repetition of ‘Two Different Words’
Structure (14) ---- Miscellaneous Patterns
Exercises: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercises: 2(A) and 2(B)

What is “Repetition of Words”?

Repetition in English Language is the repeating of a word, within a sentence in order to PROVIDE EMPHASIS. ‘Repetition of words’ could be classified into many groups based on the placement of the words in a sentence. Different terms have been devised to denote different kinds of repetitions. Some of these terms are as follows: Adnominatio, Conduplicatio, Diacope, Epistrophe, Mesodiplosis, Palilogia, Polyptoton, Symploce, etc.

Not going into the details of these ‘hard-to-pronounce’ terms, I have covered only most popular patterns of ‘Repetition of words’ in this book.

Structure (1) ---- Word + and + Word

This pattern is generally used to show ‘continuation or repetition of an activity’, or ‘presence of many things or people of the same kind’.

1. -- She asked and asked about the money.
2a. -- Stars, planets, and galaxies emerged and evolved billions and billions of years ago.
2b. -- They have got billions and billions of dollars lying around in vaults.
3. -- There has been campaign and campaign against us for a very long time.
4. -- Wastage of water must be discouraged and discouraged.
5. -- Workers dug and dug the road.
6. -- We have eras and eras coming.
7. -- He called after her, “Where are you going?” She went further and further.
8a. -- His confidence grew and grew.
8b. -- Once he started telling family about his challenge, the support just grew and grew.
9a. -- ‘How long did the match last?’ ‘Oh, hours and hours’
9b. -- Oats are a complex carbohydrate which means they will fuel your body for hours and hours.
10. -- Merit and merit alone can be criterion.
11. -- The road went on for miles and miles.
12. -- My travel plan was mired and mired in utter confusion.
13. -- He has nurtured and nurtured his reputation as a master tactician.
14. -- They played and played cards all night.

NOTE:
(A). ‘Again and again’
[meaning -- many times]
She was wiping her tears again and again.
Many people do not repeat their mistakes again and again.

(B). ‘By and by’
[meaning -- after a short period; before long; soon | eventually]
By and by you will make your deficiency.
The hours just kept on going by and by.

(C). ‘Half and half’
[meaning -- in equal parts]
We are lucky that it is an affordable rent, and sharing half and half helps

(D). ‘Less and less’
[meaning -- continuing to become smaller]
We are having less and less snow each year.
Old people seem to sleep less and less actually.

(E). ‘More and more’
[meaning -- continuing to become larger in amount or number]
You always ask for more and more.
More and more girls are giving priority to their career.

(F). ‘Neck and neck’
[meaning -- level with somebody in competition]
Democrats and Republicans were neck and neck on 50 seats.
These two candidates are neck and neck in recent polls.

NOTE: Great Stress—
Word + And + Word + And + Word
1a. -- He just smacked him with a ruler again and again and again.
1b. -- If at first you don't succeed, try again and again and again.
2. -- Their pain and the anger grew and grew and grew,
3. -- They are paying him millions and millions, and more millions.
4. -- There is a huge problem in this town and it has been going on and on and on.
This Book Covers The Following Topics:

1. Agreeing Or Disagreeing In English
A. Agreeing In English
B. Disagreeing In English

2. Agreements and Disagreements With Statements
A1. Affirmative Addition to Affirmative Remarks - I
A2. Affirmative Addition to Affirmative Remarks – II
(Agreement with Affirmative Remarks)

B1. Negative Addition to Negative Remarks - I
B2. Negative Addition to Negative Remarks - II
(Agreement with Negative Remarks)

C1. Negative Addition to Affirmative Remarks - I
C2. Negative Addition to Affirmative Remarks - II
(Disagreement with Affirmative Remarks)

D1. Affirmative Addition to Negative Remarks - I
D2. Affirmative Addition to Negative Remarks - II
(Disagreement with Negative Remarks)

Exercises: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercises: 2(A) and 2(B)


Sample This:

1. Agreeing Or Disagreeing In English

A. Agreeing In English

Expressions to show agreement:

Absolutely!
Exactly!
I agree entirely.
I agree to some extent.
I agree with you entirely.
I agree with you in part/principle.
I agree with you up to a point.
I am of the same opinion.
I assume so.
I believe so.
I completely agree (with you).
I couldn't agree more. [used to show total agreement]
I see exactly what you mean!
I simply must agree with that.
I think so.
I totally agree!
I was just going to say that.
It is absolutely clear.
Me too!
No doubt about it.
That seems obvious.
That’s exactly what I think.
That’s right!
That’s true.
That's for sure.
That's quite true.
That's so true.
There is no doubt about it that.
True enough.
Yes, I agree!
Yes, OK.
You are absolutely right.
You are right. That's a good point.
You could be right.
You have a point there.


A1. Affirmative Addition to Affirmative Remarks - I

(Agreement with Affirmative Remarks - I)

PATTERN – 1

USING ‘SAME SUBJECT’ IN AFFIRMATIVE ADDITION

STRUCTURE: Yes/So/Of course, etc. + Subject + Verb- ‘Be/Do/Have/Modal’
NOTE: You can also use phrase “That’s true!”

Example 1:
Affirmative Remark – She is originally from Britain.
Agreement (Affirmative Addition) –
Yes, she is. [yes + subject + verb- ‘be’]
OR
That’s true!

Example 2:
Affirmative Remark – Authorities are gathering evidences.
Agreement (Affirmative Addition) –
So, they (= authorities) are. [so + subject + verb- ‘be’]
OR
That’s true!

Example 3:
Affirmative Remark – People across the world are taking to yoga and meditation.
Agreement (Affirmative Addition) –
Yes, they (= people) are. [yes + subject + verb- ‘be’]
OR
That’s true!

Example 4:
Affirmative Remark – She was the most studious student of the batch.
Agreement (Affirmative Addition) –
Of course, she was. [of course + subject + verb- ‘be’]
OR
That’s true!

Example 5:
Affirmative Remark – The police were seeking an arrest warrant for a suspect.
Agreement (Affirmative Addition) –
Yes, they (the police) were. [yes + subject + verb- ‘be’]
OR
That’s true!
This Book Covers The Following Topics:
 
Structure (1a) ---- Comparison of Actions - I
Structure (1b) ---- Comparison of Actions - II
Structure (2a) ---- Comparison of Qualities - I
Structure (2b) ---- Comparison of Qualities - II
Structure (3a) ---- Specific Similarity – Quality Adjectives
Structure (3b) ---- Specific Similarity – Quality Nouns
Structure (4) ---- Comparison of Number/Quantity
Structure (5a) ---- As + Much/Many, etc. + Word/Words + As
Structure (5b) ---- Comparative Estimates – Multiple Numbers
Structure (6) ---- Parallel Increase or Decrease / Gradual Increase
Structure (7) ---- Illogical Comparatives
Structure (8) ---- General Similarity and Difference
Structure (9) ---- Using Word ‘Compare’ or ‘Comparison’
Structure (10) ---- Comparison Degrees
10a. Regular and Irregular Forms of Adjectives
10b. Interchange of Positive and Comparative Degrees
10c. Interchange of Positive and Superlative Degrees
10d. Interchange of Comparative and Superlative Degrees
10e. Interchange of Positive, Comparative and Superlative Degrees
EXERCISE – 1
EXERCISE – 2

Sample This:

Structure (1a) ---- Comparison of Actions - I

PATTERN 1:
AFFIRMATIVE SENTENCE
-ING form of Verb + Verb ‘Be’ + As + Adjective + As + -ING form of Verb
Or
It + Verb ‘Be’ + As + Adjective + To + Ordinary Verb + As + Ordinary Verb

Writing is as easy as thinking.
Jogging is as easy as exercising.
Closing is as easy as opening.
Designing is as easy as publishing.

It is as easy to write as think.
It is as easy to jog as exercise.
It is as easy to close as open.
It is as easy to design as publish.


PATTERN 2:
NEGATIVE SENTENCE
-ING form of Verb + Verb ‘To Be’ + Not + As + Adjective + As + -ING form of Verb
Or
It + Verb ‘To Be’ + Not + As + Adjective + To + Ordinary Verb + As + Ordinary Verb

Studying is not as easy as playing.
Swimming is not as easy as running.
Singing is not as easy as talking.
Reading is not as easy as listening.

It is not as easy to study as play.
It is not as easy to swim as run.
It is not as easy to sing as talk.
It is not as easy to read as listen.


Structure (1b) ---- Comparison of Actions - II

PATTERN
(A). Prefer/Would Prefer + -ING form of Verb + To + -ING form of Verb, OR
(B). Prefer/Would Prefer + To + Ordinary Verb + Rather Than + Ordinary Verb, OR
(C). Had Better/Had Rather/Had Sooner/Would Rather/Would Sooner + Ordinary Verb + Than + Ordinary Verb

Example 1:
I prefer studying to playing.
I would prefer studying to playing.

I prefer to study rather than play.
I would prefer to study rather than play.

I had better study than play.
I had rather study than play.
I had sooner study than play.
I would rather study than play.
I would sooner study than play.

Example 2:
You prefer writing to talking.
You would prefer writing to talking.

You prefer to write rather than talk.
You would prefer to write rather than talk.

You had better write than talk.
You had rather write than talk.
You had sooner write than talk.
You would rather write than talk.
You would sooner write than talk.
This Book Covers The Following Topics:

How to Start a Sentence
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘AS’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘AFTER’ and ‘BEFORE’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘BY’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘FOR/FROM
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘IF’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘OF/ON/OUT’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘TO’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘IN’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘WITH’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘QUESTION WORDS’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘ING’ FORM of VERBS
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘PAST PARTICIPLES’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘-LY Words’
Start a Sentence -- Using ‘PRONOUNS’
Start a Sentence – Miscellaneous
Exercises: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercises: 2(A) and 2(B)

Sample This:

There are different ways to start a sentence in English. Using pronoun (I, we, you, they, he, she, it) is the most popular way to begin a sentence. But there are many other words which are widely used to start a sentence. They might be question words (what, where, etc.). They might be words formed from verbs, ending in –ing, -ed, -en, etc. Besides, words such as ‘to’ ‘in’ ‘with’, ‘if’, ‘after’ are also used to begin a sentence.
Here, you will learn various words and phrases to start a sentence with.

Important Note:
Starting a sentence with ‘and’ or ‘but’ is correct or not!

Using ‘And’ or ‘But’ to begin a sentence is generally considered grammatically Incorrect. But there is no hard and fast rule in this regard. So, you can use ‘And’ or ‘But’ to begin a sentence. But avoid excessive use of these words to begin a sentence. Use these words in the beginning of a sentence only when they really give strength to your language.

Note: It is said that a sentence should not be begun with a conjunction of any kind, especially one of the FANBOYS (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so). But this is not hard and fast rule. Particularly in spoken English, starting a sentence with ‘And’ or ‘But’ is common.


How to start a sentence -- Using ‘AS’

As a matter of fact no notice was given to anyone.
As a policeman myself, I am aware of all the laws.
As against last time four days, the fair will last for five days this year.
As always, he won the match.
As an interim arrangement, we directed the authorities not to return the land.
As fate would have it, he crossed the international border.
As for David, he is doing fine.
As he got busy, she picked up his son.
As he grew older, he developed his communications skills.
As if the bad power situation in the city wasn’t enough, the hike in power tariff has come as the last straw for residents.
As in the past, party president distanced herself from the government’s unpopular decision.
As long as here is violence by unruly mobs, use of police force is inevitable.
As often happened, he forgot to send me reply.
As part of the deal, they will hand-over control of five west bank towns.
As penance, he vowed to never scold any kid ever again.
As per his version, nobody had got injured in the incident.
As per rules, the same bill should be passed by the two Houses of the Parliament before it is sent to the President for his signature and promulgation for implementation.
As sanitary workers are absent on most of the days, sweeping of that road is also irregular resulting in trash along the road.
As the bus was nearing, / As the bus neared him, he moved aside.
As the day progressed, over a hundred men protestors gathered at the office.
As the electric cables are hanging loosely, it may anytime lead to major accident if any passer-by comes into contact.
As the mercury levels are dropping each day, difficulties for the poor are constantly rising.
As the war widened, they had to leave the city.
As we progresses, it is going to become more and more difficult.
As you know, I have sent him a letter.
This Book Covers the Following Topics:

Transitional Expressions -- Definition
Transitional Expressions – Punctuation Rules
01. Transitional Expressions -- Addition
02. Transitional Expressions -- Cause and Effect
03. Transitional Expressions -- Concession
04. Transitional Expressions -- Condition
05. Transitional Expressions -- Consequence
06. Transitional Expressions -- Contrast
07. Transitional Expressions -- Dismissal
08. Transitional Expressions -- Illustration
09. Transitional Expressions -- Emphasis
10. Transitional Expressions -- Exception
11. Transitional Expressions -- Explanation
12. Transitional Expressions -- Generalization
13. Transitional Expressions -- Location
14. Transitional Expressions -- Purpose
15. Transitional Expressions -- Quantifier
16. Transitional Expressions -- Reference
17. Transitional Expressions -- Sequence
18. Transitional Expressions – Similarity
19. Transitional Expressions -- Summary
20. Transitional Expressions -- Time
Exercise: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercise: 2(A) to 2(C)


SAMPLE THIS:

Transitional Expressions -- Definition

Meaning of ‘Transition’ -- to go from one point to another
“Transitional Expressions” = “Transitional Words” + “Transitional Phrases”
“Transitional (or Transition) Words” are also known as “connecting words”, “linking words” or “signal words“
“Transitional (or Transition) Phrases” are also known as “connecting phrases”, “linking phrases” or “signal phrases“

“Transitional Expressions” (also “Transitions”) could be defined as follows:
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ are words or phrases that provide bridges between sentences, parts of sentences, paragraphs and sections.
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ connect and relate sentences and paragraphs.
•    ‘Transitions expressions’ signal the relationship between sentences and paragraphs.
•    ‘Transitions expressions’ state the connections between ideas.
•    ‘Transitions expressions’ help carry over a thought from one part of a sentence to another, from one sentence to another, from one paragraph to another, from one section to another, or from one idea to another.
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ connect ideas from sentence to sentence and paragraph to paragraph.
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ are placed in the beginning, middle, or end of the sentences/paragraphs to explain connections between two or more ideas.
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ help carry over a thought from one idea to another.
•    ‘Transitional expressions’ produce clearer expression, by eliminating the excessive use of such words as ‘and’, ‘but’, ‘for’ ‘nor’, ‘or’ ‘so’ ‘yet’, etc.

Choosing Transitional Expression --
Some transitional words and transitional phrases belong to more than one category. A transitional expression can change the whole meaning of a sentence. Therefore, you should choose the transition that best conveys your meaning. You should also avoid repetition and use different transition words or phrases in the same category if necessary.

Placing transitional words:
There are three options for placing transitional words:
• The beginning of a sentence [Most common]
• The middle of a sentence
• The end of a sentence [Least Common]

Example:
Their products come with an insurance pack that covers accidental damage, theft, and breakage for a year. Furthermore, customers can also avail for an additional year of warranty. [Use of transitional word ‘furthermore’ at the beginning of a sentence]

Their products come with an insurance pack that covers accidental damage, theft, and breakage for a year. Customers, furthermore, can also avail for an additional year of warranty. [Use of transitional word ‘furthermore’ in the middle of a sentence]

Their products come with an insurance pack that covers accidental damage, theft, and breakage for a year. Customers can also avail for an additional year of warranty, furthermore. [Use of transitional word ‘furthermore’ in the end of a sentence]
The Art of Public Speaking is a fantastic introduction to public speaking by the master of the art, Dale Carnegie. Public speaking is the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner intended to inform, influence, or entertain the listeners. It is closely allied to "presenting", although the latter has more of a commercial connotation.

In public speaking, as in any form of communication, there are five basic elements, often expressed as "who is saying what to whom using what medium with what effects?" The purpose of public speaking can range from simply transmitting information, to motivating people to act, to simply telling a story. Good orators should be able to change the emotions of their listeners, not just inform them. Public speaking can also be considered a discourse community. Interpersonal communication and public speaking have several components that embrace such things as motivational speaking, leadership/personal development, business, customer service, large group communication, and mass communication. Public speaking can be a powerful tool to use for purposes such as motivation, influence, persuasion, informing, translation, or simply entertaining. A confident speaker is more likely to use this as excitement and create effective speech thus increasing their overall ethos.

Dale Breckenridge Carnegie (originally Carnagey until 1922 and possibly somewhat later) (November 24, 1888 – November 1, 1955) was an American writer, lecturer, and the developer of famous courses in self-improvement, salesmanship, corporate training, public speaking, and interpersonal skills. Born in poverty on a farm in Missouri, he was the author of How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936), a massive bestseller that remains popular today. He also wrote How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1948), Lincoln the Unknown (1932), and several other books.

Perhaps one of Carnegie’s most successful marketing moves was to change the spelling of his last name from “Carnagey” to Carnegie, at a time when Andrew Carnegie (unrelated) was a widely revered and recognized name. By 1916, Dale was able to rent Carnegie Hall itself for a lecture to a packed house. Carnegie's first collection of his writings was Public Speaking: a Practical Course for Business Men (1926), later entitled Public Speaking and Influencing Men in Business (1932). His crowning achievement, however, was when Simon & Schuster published How to Win Friends and Influence People. The book was a bestseller from its debut in 1936, in its 17th printing within a few months. By the time of Carnegie's death, the book had sold five million copies in 31 languages, and there had been 450,000 graduates of his Dale Carnegie Institute. It has been stated in the book that he had critiqued over 150,000 speeches in his participation in the adult education movement of the time. During World War I he served in the U.S. Army.

One of the core ideas in his books is that it is possible to change other people's behavior by changing one's reaction to them.
This Book Covers The Following Topics:

1. AS---AS
1A. AS EARLY AS
1B. AS FAR AS
1C. AS LONG AS
1D. AS MANY AS
1E. AS MUCH AS
1F. AS SOON AS
1G. AS WELL AS
2. EITHER---OR
3. NEITHER---NOR
4. WHETHER---OR
5. BARELY/HARDLY/SCARCELY---WHEN
6. NO SOONER---THAN
7. RATHER---THAN
8. NOT ONLY---BUT ALSO
9. ALTHOUGH---YET
10. TOO---TO
11. BETWEEN---AND
12. BOTH---AND
13. SO THAT
14. UNLESS
15. UNTIL
16. OTHERS
Exercises: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercises: 2(A) and 2(B)
Exercises: 3(A) and 3(B)


Sample This:

1. AS---AS

Correlative Words connect words, phrases, and clauses. They are generally used in the form of pair of words.

As -- As
This Pattern Is Used When You Are Comparing or Linking Two People Or Things, Or Two Situations

EXAMPLES:
AS EARLY AS
AS FAR AS
AS LONG AS
AS MANY AS
AS MUCH AS
AS SOON AS
AS WELL AS


1A. AS EARLY AS
‘As Early As’ Is Used To Show --
Done Before the Expected, Usual or Planned Time

Elections will be held as early as possible.
As early as 7:30 a.m. on Sunday, he was surprised to see the policemen.
Companies could announce the agreement as early as Tuesday.
Given their importance, it makes sense to nurture good values in children as early as possible.
I woke up as early as 4 a.m.
International sanctions on it could start to be lifted as early as spring next year.
We demand that the government acts firmly and culprits are booked as early as possible.
Latest refund mechanism facility will help its customers get refunds as early as within 24 hours of returning the product.
Our company is looking to invest in Australia as early as next year.
Reserve Bank will cut interest rates again, possibly as early as this month.
Scores of people visit the beaches of East Coast Road as early as 5 a.m. for their daily exercises.
Company is in process to complete the audit as early as possible and will submit the audited financial results in due course of time.
Government planned to overhaul the corporate debt market by pushing all issuance onto an electronic platform as early as November.
She could return to China as early as this month, the media reported on Tuesday.
She had as early as 1815 directed that the state should settle the entire cost of education of its people.
A special report is scheduled to be released as early as this month.
First signs of global warming felt as early as 1940s.
Forecasters predicted national capital could experience sub-zero temperatures as early as next month.
Street clearance in the areas surrounding the art museum is scheduled to begin as early as Sunday at 6:00 p.m.
This year's flu outbreak can happen as early as October and can last as late as May.
Tropical Storm Erika was expected to hit the Southeast as early as Sunday.
Government should make sure that construction of the college starts as early as possible.
Police commissioner is all set to complete the probe into the case as early as possible.
The Centre today asked the states to take steps in making special courts functional as early as possible.
School principal wanted all files as early as possible.
About 100 people lined up outside security barricades as early as 3 a.m.
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