Edward the Confessor

Yale University Press
2
Free sample

Frank Barlow's magisterial biography, first published in 1970 and now reissued with new material, rescues Edward the Confessor from contemporary myth and subsequent bogus scholarship. Disentangling verifiable fact from saintly legend, he vividly re-creates the final years of the Anglo-Danish monarchy and examines England before the Norman Conquest with deep insight and great historical understanding.

"Deploying all the resources of formidable scholarship, [Barlow] has recovered the real Edward." — Spectator

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About the author

Frank Barlow was Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Exeter until his death in 2009.
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4.5
2 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Yale University Press
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Published on
Jun 28, 2011
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Pages
373
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ISBN
9780300183825
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Royalty
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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