Micromotives and Macrobehavior

W. W. Norton & Company
2
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Before Freakonomics and The Tipping Point there was this classic by the 2005 Nobel Laureate in Economics.

"Schelling here offers an early analysis of 'tipping' in social situations involving a large number of individuals." —official citation for the 2005 Nobel Prize

Micromotives and Macrobehavior was originally published over twenty-five years ago, yet the stories it tells feel just as fresh today. And the subject of these stories—how small and seemingly meaningless decisions and actions by individuals often lead to significant unintended consequences for a large group—is more important than ever. In one famous example, Thomas C. Schelling shows that a slight-but-not-malicious preference to have neighbors of the same race eventually leads to completely segregated populations.

The updated edition of this landmark book contains a new preface and the author's Nobel Prize acceptance speech.

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About the author

Thomas C. Schelling (1921—2016) was the co-winner of the 2005 Nobel Memorial Prize for Economic Science and the Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Economics and Public Policy at the University of Maryland.

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Additional Information

Publisher
W. W. Norton & Company
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Published on
Oct 17, 2006
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9780393069778
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economic History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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A brilliant and sobering challenge to the idea that poor societies can be economically developed through outside intervention, A Farewell to Alms may change the way global economic history is understood.

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