To the Arctic by Canoe 1819-1821: The Journal and Paintings of Robert Hood, Midshipman with Franklin

McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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When supplies ran out, the return trek across the Barrens became one of the most tragic incidents in the history of Arctic exploration. Robert Hood was one of those who perished on this trip. Weakened by starvation, he was shot through the head by a member of the party turned cannibal. A highly sensitive and educated man with a painter's eye for detail, Hood was an astute observer of the political and social ways of the North. The journal reveals his awareness, unusual in his time, of the adverse effects on Native peoples and their environment of the coming of the Europeans. Hood's paintings capture the beauty as well as the harshness of the North. His bird paintings in particular are of special artistic and historical interest.
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Publisher
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Published on
Oct 26, 1994
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Pages
280
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ISBN
9780773564916
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Expeditions & Discoveries
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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