Myth of the Modern Homosexual: Queer History and the Search for Cultural Unity

Bloomsbury Publishing
2
Free sample

With careful reasoning supported by wide-ranging scholarship, this study exposes the fallacies of 'social constructionist' theories within lesbian and gay studies and makes a forceful case for the autonomy of queer identity and culture. It presents evidence that queers are part of a centuries-old history, possessing a unified historical and cultural identity. The volume reviews the fundamental historiographical issues about the nature of queer history, arguing that a new generation of queer historians will need to abandon authoritarian dogma founded upon politically-correct ideology rather than historical experience. Norton offers a clear exposition of the evidence for ancient, indigenous and pre-modern queer cultural continuity, revealing how knowledge of that history has been suppressed and censored and sets out the 'queer cultural essentialist' position on the key topics of queer history – role, identity, bisexuality, orientation, linguistics, social control, homophobia, subcultures, and kinship patterns.
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About the author

Rictor Norton is an American writer on literary and cultural history, particularly gay history.
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5.0
2 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing
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Published on
Oct 6, 2016
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Pages
336
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ISBN
9781474286923
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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