Hidden Agendas: What We Need to Know about the TPPA

Bridget Williams Books
1
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‘Forget the label “free trade agreement”. The TPPA, under
negotiation between New Zealand, the USA and ten other countries, is a
direct assault on our right to decide our own future.’

In
this hard-hitting BWB Text, Professor Jane Kelsey picks apart the
current negotiations surrounding the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership
Agreement (TPPA) and comes to some disturbing conclusions.

Such a
treaty, she says in this new work, has little credible economic
rationale but could have potentially dangerous effects on our ability to
decide for ourselves how we address the economic, environmental, social
and Treaty challenges of the twenty-first century. At a time of
constitutional review, the secrecy surrounding the TPPA negotiations
raises hard questions about the future shape of New Zealand.

 

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About the author

Jane Kelsey is one of New Zealand’s most acute social commentators. Professor of Law at the University of Auckland, she is actively committed to social justice in her teaching, her work on Māori sovereignty, and her international research and advocacy on the crisis in globalisation. For several decades her work has centred on the interface between globalisation and domestic neoliberalism, with particular reference to free trade and investment agreements. Jane is currently researching national and international techniques for embedding neoliberalism as barriers to transformation to a post-neoliberal era.

Professor Kelsey is committed to socio-legal scholarship which brings law into contact with politics, economics, social justice, colonisation and international relations. She has written a number of books and many articles critical of the neoliberal restructuring of the New Zealand state, Treaty of Waitangi policy and international economic regulation. A committed public intellectual, Jane is a frequent media commentator, public speaker and participant in international forums on globalisation and structural adjustment.

Professor Kelsey travels extensively, talking on globalisation, free trade agreements and lessons for other countries from New Zealand’s neoliberal experiment to a wide range of audiences. She is frequently invited to deliver international lectures and conference addresses, provides intellectual leadership in international policy debates, is commissioned to write expert reports, and advises governments and international NGOs.

 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
May 1, 2013
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Pages
84
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ISBN
9781927131909
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / International Relations / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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