The Other Arab-Israeli Conflict: Making America's Middle East Policy, from Truman to Reagan

University of Chicago Press
Free sample

The Other Arab-Israeli Conflict illuminates the controversial course of America's Middle East relations from the birth of Israel to the Reagan administration. Skillfully separating actual policymaking from the myths that have come to surround it, Spiegel challenges the belief that American policy in the Middle East is primarily a relation to events in that region or is motivated by bureaucratic constraints or the pressures of domestic politics. On the contrary, he finds that the ideas and skills of the president and his advisors are critical to the determination of American policy. This volume received the 1986 National Jewish Book Award.
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About the author

Steven L. Spiegel is professor of political science at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has written extensively on international politics, American foreign policy, and the Middle East.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Dec 10, 2014
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Pages
538
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ISBN
9780226226149
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Language
English
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Genres
History / General
Political Science / General
Political Science / International Relations / Diplomacy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Like its two predecessors in the "Collected Papers "series, this volume is based on the proceedings of an international colloquium held at Tel Aviv University. The colloquium was organized in March 1978 by the Shiloah Center in cooperation with the University's newly established Center for Strategic Studies.

As the title and subtitle imply, special emphasis was laid on the images and perceptions that people of the Middle East and the United States have had of one another, and the way in which their relationship is viewed from within the area, from Washington and from other pertinent vantage points. The conference also dealt with five other major issues: the historic background and evolution of American policy in the Middle East (papers by Elie Kedourie from the London School of Economics and Wilfrid Knapp from Oxford University); American interests in the Middle East (papers by Uzi Arad from Tel Aviv University, Gad Gilbar from Haifa University, and Bernard Reich from George Washington University); the international context within which American policy in the area is conducted (Ya'acov Ro'i from Tel Aviv University, Richard Rosecrance from Cornell University, and Udo Steinbach from the Orient Institut in Hamburg); the formulation of American policies in the Middle East (Steven Spiegel from UCLA); and America's bilateral relationship with several Middle Eastern states (papers by Yoram Dinstein, Yair Evron, Gideon Gera, Itamar Rabinovich. anc Shimon Shamir from Tel Aviv University, and John Waterbury from Princeton University); the papers which dealt directly with views, images, and their depiction were presented by Bernard Lewis from Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study, and Haim Shaked from Tel Aviv University.

"Contents and Contributors: "Introduction / Background and Evolution "Elie Kedourie, "The Transition from a British to an American Era in the Middle East; "Wilfrid Knapp. "The U.S. and the Middle East: How Many Special Relationships? /Formulation of American Policies "Richard Rosecrance, "Objectives of U.S.-Middle East Policy; "Bernard Reich, "U.S. Interests in the Middle East; "Steven L. Spiegel, "The Carter Approach to the Arab-Israeli Dispute / The International Context "Udo Steinbach, "The European Community and the U.S. in the Arab World: "Yaacov Ro'i, "The U.S. Role in the Middle East / The Regional Development "Bernard Lewis, "The U.S., Turkey, and Iran; "Itamar Rabinovich, "The Challenge of Diversity; "Gideon Gera, "Libya and the U.S. / Oil and Economics "Gad G. Gilbar, "The Economics of Interdependence; "Uzi Arad, "The Short Term Effectiveness of an Arab Oil Embargo / Cairo and Washington "Shimon Shamir, "Egypt's Reorientation Towards the U.S.; "Haim Shaked, "A Stereotype Illustrated: An Egyptian Cartoonist's Preception of the "U.S.', John Water-hurry, "The Implications of Infitah for U.S.Egyptian Relations / Strategic and legal Aspects "Yair Evron, "Some Political and Strategic Implications of an American-Israeli Defense Treaty; "Yoram Dinstein, "International Guarantees and the Middle East Conflict

The first rule of warfare is to know one’s enemy. The second is to know thyself. More than fifteen years and three quarters of a trillion dollars after the US invasion of Afghanistan, it’s clear that the United States followed neither rule well.

America’s goals in Afghanistan were lofty to begin with: dismantle al Qaeda, remove the Taliban from power, remake the country into a democracy. But not only did the mission come completely unmoored from reality, the United States wasted billions of dollars, and thousands of lives were lost. Our Latest Longest War is a chronicle of how, why, and in what ways the war in Afghanistan failed. Edited by historian and Marine lieutenant colonel Aaron B. O’Connell, the essays collected here represent nine different perspectives on the war—all from veterans of the conflict, both American and Afghan. Together, they paint a picture of a war in which problems of culture and an unbridgeable rural-urban divide derailed nearly every field of endeavor. The authors also draw troubling parallels to the Vietnam War, arguing that deep-running ideological currents in American life explain why the US government has repeatedly used armed nation-building to try to transform failing states into modern, liberal democracies. In Afghanistan, as in Vietnam, this created a dramatic mismatch of means and ends that neither money, technology, nor the force of arms could overcome.

The war in Afghanistan has been the longest in US history, and in many ways, the most confounding. Few who fought in it think it has been worthwhile. These are difficult topics for any American or Afghan to consider, especially those who lost friends or family in it. This sobering history—written by the very people who have been fighting the war—is impossible to ignore.
A Brookings Institution Press and the University of California Press publication

Updated through the first term of President George W. Bush, the latest edition of this classic work analyzes how each U.S. president since Lyndon Johnson has dealt with the complex challenge of Arab-Israeli peacemaking. There have been remarkable successes—such as the Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty—frustrating failures, and dangerous wars along the way. This book helps to situate the current Middle East crisis in historical context and point to some possible ways out of the impasse between Israelis and Palestinians. Quandt suggests a clear U.S. commitment to a two-state solution—one that would assure Israel of security and peace within the 1967 treaty-established borders, offer the Palestinians an early end to Israeli occupation of Gaza and most of the West Bank, and establish both a Jewish and Arab Jerusalem.

Written especially for classroom use, Peace Process is also an invaluable resource for policymakers and anyone interested in this vital region of the world.

Praise for previous editions of Peace Process

“Clearly written, carefully balanced and comprehensive in scope . . . should prove invaluable to all serious students of American foreign policy.”—New York Times Book Review

“A major work, whether judged by the standards of classical diplomatic history or modern political science.”—Foreign Affairs

“Provides fresh insights into the complexities of creating the process and defining the substance of American foreign policymaking.”—Survival

“While objective to a fault, Quandt writes with an insider's knowledge of policymaking and decisions taken at the highest levels of government.”—Middle East Policy

“Both a history and analysis of an evolving relationship between Israel and its Arab opponents.”—Choice

“A major contribution to understanding the complexity of U.S. presidents’ handling of the [Arab-Israeli] conflict. It should be compulsory reading for anyone studying the Middle East conflict, peacemaking and conflict resolution.”—Journal of Peace Research
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