Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists

Cambridge University Press
Free sample

Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and the sophist as difficult to distinguish, insofar as both use rhetoric as part of their arguments. Plato does not present philosophy as rhetoric-free, but rather shows that rhetoric is an integral part of philosophy. However, the philosopher and the sophist are distinguished by the philosopher's love of the forms as the ultimate objects of desire. It is this love of the forms that informs the philosopher's rhetoric, which he uses to lead his partner to better understand his deepest desires. McCoy's work is of interest to philosophers, classicists, and communications specialists alike in its careful yet comprehensive treatment of philosophy, sophistry, and rhetoric as portrayed through the drama of the dialogues.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
Sep 24, 2007
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Pages
221
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ISBN
9781139468565
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Ancient / General
Philosophy / History & Surveys / Ancient & Classical
Philosophy / History & Surveys / General
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This content is DRM protected.
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