The History of the Gaelic Athletic Association in Canada

Trafford Publishing
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The history of Gaelic games in Canada, before the founding of the Gaelic Athletic Association in Ireland in 1884 and in the years since, proves a determination by Irish immigrants who have arrived in numerous provinces of Canada. Through their dedication the flag of Irish sports has flown strong, and will continue to fly in the years to come.

The sporting traditions include the oldest European field game of hurling-a masterful art and the fastest game in the world-in which players use an ash wood stick and a hard ball. Many argue with some conviction, and no small amount of fact to support their case, that Canada's national sport, ice hockey, has its origins in hurling. The word puck is derived from the Irish word poc, which is the action of striking the ball with a hurley.

In 1845, the civic fathers of Quebec City banned the playing of hurling in their narrow streets, while in St. John's, Newfoundland, hurling was being played as early as 1788 at the "Barrens" of the city. The ladies' version of hurling, Camogie, has had its presence on occasion in some Canadian communities. The skilful play of Gaelic Football, which has dominated the sporting scene across the country in many Canadian cities, continues to be the greatest strength in modern times. Along with two other Irish sports of handball and rounders, many wonderful memories for the Canadian-Irish community are celebrated in this book that captures an exciting facet of Irish culture.

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About the author

John O'Flynn's late father, Thomas O'Flynn (Kilmeedy, County Limerick), first came to Toronto in 1953, and his late mother, Elizabeth (nee O'Keeffe) (Duagh, County Kerry), arrived together as a married couple in 1962 to British Columbia. John was born in 1964 and attended Vancouver's St. Patrick's Elementary, Vancouver College and graduated from the Seminary of Christ the King in Mission.

John's parents introduced him to Ireland's national games of Gaelic Football and Hurling with the members of the Vancouver Irish Sporting and Social Club. He had the opportunity to represent the club and play Gaelic Football in two USGAA Championships: 1984 Boston and 1985 Chicago. He attended the founding meeting in Toronto of the Canadian Gaelic Athletic Association in 1987 and served as secretary. He has presented workshops on Gaelic Football to teachers and summer camps that introduce the games to youth. John has also served as a referee in both minor and adult games in the United States and Canada.

John resides in the City of North Vancouver, B.C. with his wife, Kathleen, and is father to Matthias, Kristiann, Kelleigh, Emily and Michael. A graduate of Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, John has taught in both denominational and non-denominational schools in Richmond (St. Paul's K-7), Powell River (Assumption K-8), (Vancouver College K-12), West Vancouver (Mulgrave K-12). North Vancouver (Holy Trinity K-7) Vancouver's OLPH K-7 and North Vancouver's St. Pius X (K-7).

John served as a Commissioner on the North Vancouver Museum and Archives Commission, is a past Director of the North Vancouver Football Club and presently serves on the North Shore Youth Soccer Association and BC Coastal Soccer League.

John O'Flynn's late father, Thomas O'Flynn (Kilmeedy, County Limerick), first came to Toronto in 1953, and his late mother, Elizabeth (nee O'Keeffe) (Duagh, County Kerry), arrived together as a married couple in 1962 to British Columbia. John was born in 1964 and attended Vancouver's St. Patrick's Elementary, Vancouver College and graduated from the Seminary of Christ the King in Mission.

John's parents introduced him to Ireland's national games of Gaelic Football and Hurling with the members of the Vancouver Irish Sporting and Social Club. He had the opportunity to represent the club and play Gaelic Football in two USGAA Championships: 1984 Boston and 1985 Chicago. He attended the founding meeting in Toronto of the Canadian Gaelic Athletic Association in 1987 and served as secretary. He has presented workshops on Gaelic Football to teachers and summer camps that introduce the games to youth. John has also served as a referee in both minor and adult games in the United States and Canada.

John resides in the City of North Vancouver, B.C. with his wife, Kathleen, and is father to Matthias, Kristiann, Kelleigh, Emily and Michael. A graduate of Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, John has taught in both denominational and non-denominational schools in Richmond (St. Paul's K-7), Powell River (Assumption K-8), (Vancouver College K-12), West Vancouver (Mulgrave K-12). North Vancouver (Holy Trinity K-7) Vancouver's OLPH K-7 and North Vancouver's St. Pius X (K-7).

John served as a Commissioner on the North Vancouver Museum and Archives Commission, is a past Director of the North Vancouver Football Club and presently serves on the North Shore Youth Soccer Association and BC Coastal Soccer League.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Trafford Publishing
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Published on
Jul 4, 2008
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Pages
216
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ISBN
9781466954601
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
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This content is DRM protected.
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This book brings together important material from a range of sources and highlights how government organizations, musicians, academics and commercial companies are concerned with, and seek to use, a particular notion of Irish musical identity. Rooting the study in the context of the recent history of popular, traditional and classical music in Ireland, as well as providing an overview of aspects of the national field of music production and consumption, O'Flynn goes on to argue that the relationship between Irish identity and Irish music emerges as a contested site of meaning. His analysis exposes the negotiation and articulation of civic, ethnic and economic ideas within a shifting hegemony of national musical culture, and finds inconsistencies between and among symbolic constructions of Irish music and observed patterns in the domestic field. More specifically, O'Flynn illustrates how settings, genres, social groups and values can influence individual identifications or negations of Irishness in music. While the apprehension of intra-musical elements leads to perceptions of music that sounds Irish, style and authenticity emerge as critical articulatory principles in the identification of music that feels Irish. The celebratory and homogenizing discourse associated with the international success of some Irish musical forms is not reflected in the opinions of the people interviewed by O'Flynn; at the same time, an insider/outsider dialectic of national identity is found in various forms of discourse about Irish music. Performers and composers discussed include Bill Whelan (Riverdance), Sinead O'Connor, The Corrs, Altan, U2, Martin Hayes, Dolores Keane and Gerald Barry.
Music and Identity in Ireland and Beyond represents the first interdisciplinary volume of chapters on an intricate cultural field that can be experienced and interpreted in manifold ways, whether in Ireland (The Republic of Ireland and/or Northern Ireland), among its diaspora(s), or further afield. While each contributor addresses particular themes viewed from discrete perspectives, collectively the book contemplates whether ’music in Ireland’ can be regarded as one interrelated plane of cultural and/or national identity, given the various conceptions and contexts of both Ireland (geographical, political, diasporic, mythical) and Music (including a proliferation of practices and genres) that give rise to multiple sites of identification. Arranged in the relatively distinct yet interweaving parts of ’Historical Perspectives’, ’Recent and Contemporary Production’ and ’Cultural Explorations’, its various chapters act to juxtapose the socio-historical distinctions between the major style categories most typically associated with music in Ireland - traditional, classical and popular - and to explore a range of dialectical relationships between these musical styles in matters pertaining to national and cultural identity. The book includes a number of chapters that examine various movements (and ’moments’) of traditional music revival from the late eighteenth century to the present day, as well as chapters that tease out various issues of national identity pertaining to individual composers/performers (art music, popular music) and their audiences. Many chapters in the volume consider mediating influences (infrastructural, technological, political) and/or social categories (class, gender, religion, ethnicity, race, age) in the interpretation of music production and consumption. Performers and composers discussed include U2, Raymond Deane, Afro-Celt Sound System, E.J. Moeran, Séamus Ennis, Kevin O’Connell, Stiff Little Fingers, Frederick May, Arnold
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