Guaranteed to Fail: Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Debacle of Mortgage Finance

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The financial collapse of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in 2008 led to one of the most sweeping government interventions in private financial markets in history. The bailout has already cost American taxpayers close to $150 billion, and substantially more will be needed. The U.S. economy--and by extension, the global financial system--has a lot riding on Fannie and Freddie. They cannot fail, yet that is precisely what these mortgage giants are guaranteed to do. How can we limit the damage to our economy, and avoid making the same mistakes in the future?

Guaranteed to Fail explains how poorly designed government guarantees for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac led to the debacle of mortgage finance in the United States, weighs different reform proposals, and provides sensible, practical recommendations. Despite repeated calls for tougher action, Washington has expanded the scope of its guarantees to Fannie and Freddie, fueling more and more housing and mortgages all across the economy--and putting all of us at risk. This book unravels the dizzyingly immense, highly interconnected businesses of Fannie and Freddie. It proposes a unique model of reform that emphasizes public-private partnership, one that can serve as a blueprint for better organizing and managing government-sponsored enterprises like Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. In doing so, Guaranteed to Fail strikes a cautionary note about excessive government intervention in markets.

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About the author

Viral V. Acharya, Matthew Richardson, Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, and Lawrence J. White are professors at the Leonard N. Stern School of Business at New York University, and are experts in applied financial economics. Acharya and Richardson are the coeditors of Restoring Financial Stability and Regulating Wall Street. Van Nieuwerburgh is an expert on household finance and mortgage markets. White has studied government-sponsored enterprises for many years and served on the board of Freddie Mac from 1986 to 1989 as part of his government service as a board member on the Federal Home Loan Bank Board.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Mar 14, 2011
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Pages
232
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ISBN
9781400838097
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economic History
Business & Economics / Finance / General
Law / Business & Financial
Political Science / Public Policy / Economic Policy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Raghuram Rajan was one of the few economists who warned of the global financial crisis before it hit. Now, as the world struggles to recover, it's tempting to blame what happened on just a few greedy bankers who took irrational risks and left the rest of us to foot the bill. In Fault Lines, Rajan argues that serious flaws in the economy are also to blame, and warns that a potentially more devastating crisis awaits us if they aren't fixed.

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An insightful look at how to reform our broken financial system

The financial crisis that unfolded in September 2008 transformed the United States and world economies. As each day's headlines brought stories of bank failures and rescues, government policies drawn and redrawn against the backdrop of an historic Presidential election, and solutions that seemed to be discarded almost as soon as they were proposed, a group of thirty-three academics at New York University Stern School of Business began tackling the hard questions behind the headlines. Representing fields of finance, economics, and accounting, these professors-led by Dean Thomas Cooley and Vice Dean Ingo Walter-shaped eighteen independent policy papers that proposed market-focused solutions to the problems within a common framework. In December, with great urgency, they sent hand-bound copies to Washington. Restoring Financial Stability is the culmination of their work.

Proposes bold, yet principled approaches-including financial policy alternatives and specific courses of action-to deal with this unprecedented, systemic financial crisis Created by the contributions of various academics from New York University's Stern School of Business Provides important perspectives on both the causes of the global financial crisis as well as proposed solutions to ensure it doesn't happen again Contains detailed evaluations and analyses covering many spectrums of the marketplace

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Although observers of the Pakistani economy are well aware that a small number of family groups, popularly called "the twenty-two families," dominates the industrial structure of the country, the actual effects of this concentration of economic power on income distribution and on other areas of widespread social and political concern arc less well understood. In this important work, Lawrence J. White uses the concepts of industrial organization analysis to achieve an overall view of the problems stemming from the marked industrial concentration in Pakistan.

After discussing the economic effects of industrial concentration as they apply generally to less developed countries, Professor White reviews the Pakistani experience, estimating the overall concentration of power that exists in manufacturing, banking, and insurance. Following an estimate of the extent of concentration in individual markets, he examines the origins of this concentration of power and analyzes its economic and noneconomic effects in Pakistan. The author concludes with a review of the policies that Pakistan has pursued in dealing with industrial concentration and suggests new courses of action for the future.

Originally published in 1974.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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