Commentaries on Equity Pleadings, and the Incidents Thereof: According to the Practice of the Courts of Equity of England and America

Little, Brown,
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Little, Brown,
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 31, 1870
Read more
Collapse
Pages
816
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Best For
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Reprint of the first English edition, based on the 12th American edition with notes on English decisions by W.E. Grigsby. Originally published: London: Stevens and Haynes, 1884. lxxiii, 1093 pp.

"Probably the decisive factor in our reception of English equity was Story's Equity Jurisprudence. With much art (...) he made it seem that the precepts established by the decisions of the English Courts of Chancery coincided in substance with those of the Roman law as expounded by the civilians and hence were but statements of universal principles of natural law universally accepted in civilized states. If equity had been expounded to American judges and lawyers and students in the dry and technical fashion of the contemporary English treatises, we might have been sorely hampered in the development of American Law by a crippled equity. Story's sympathetic exposition of English equity (...) was the one thing needed to commend equity to our American courts and to counteract the forces that were working against it."-- Pound, The Formative Era in American Law 156-157

Apart from James Kent, no man has had greater influence on the development of American law than Joseph Story [1779-1845]. He was Dane Professor of Law at Harvard, where he played a key role in the growth of the school and the establishment of its national eminence, and an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, where he was the author of several landmark decisions, such as Martin v. Hunter's Lessee. His many books, most notably the monumental work Commentaries on the Constitution (1833), have been cited extensively, and he remains an authority today.

©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.