Tuai: A Traveller in Two Worlds

Bridget Williams Books
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In early 1817 Tuai, a young Ngare Raumati chief from the Bay of Islands, set off for England. He was one of a number of Māori who, after encountering European explorers, traders and missionaries in New Zealand, seized opportunities to travel beyond their familiar shores to Australia, England and Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They sought new knowledge, useful goods and technologies, and a mutually benefi cial relationship with the people they knew as Pākehā.

On his epic journey Tuai would visit exotic foreign ports, mix with teeming crowds in the huge metropolis of London, and witness the marvels of industrialisation at the Ironbridge Gorge in Shropshire. With his lively travelling companion Tītere, he would attend fashionable gatherings and sit for his portrait. He shared his deep understanding of Māori language and culture. And his missionary friends did their best to convert him to Christianity. But on returning to his Māori world in 1819, Tuai found there were difficult choices to be made. His plan to integrate new European knowledge and relationships into his Ngare Raumati community was to be challenged by the rapidly shifting politics of the Bay of Islands.

With sympathy and insight, Alison Jones and Kuni Kaa Jenkins uncover the remarkable story of one of the first Māori travellers to Europe.
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About the author

Alison Jones is an educational researcher and a Professor in Te Puna Wānanga, the School of Māori and Indigenous Education at the University of Auckland. Her first book with Kuni Kaa Jenkins, He Kōrero: Words Between Us – First Māori– Pākehā Conversations on Paper (Huia, 2011), won the Ngā Kupu Ora Māori Book Awards, the PANZ Book Design Award, and the Best Book in Higher Education Publishing (Copyright Licensing New Zealand) in 2012.

Kuni Kaa Jenkins, from Ngāti Porou, is an educational researcher and a Professor in Education at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi. Her first book with Alison Jones, He Kōrero: Words Between Us – First Māori– Pākehā Conversations on Paper (Huia, 2011), won the Ngā Kupu Ora Māori Book Awards, the PANZ Book Design Award, and the Best Book in Higher Education Publishing (Copyright Licensing New Zealand) in 2012.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
Jul 10, 2017
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Pages
288
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ISBN
9780947518813
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Australia & New Zealand
History / Expeditions & Discoveries
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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