Nolo's Plain-English Law Dictionary

Nolo
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Learn the language of the law, without the legalese!

Open the average law dictionary and chances are you'll feel more confused than before you read a word. Nolo's Plain-English Law Dictionary is different. From "abrogate" to "zero tape", we've cut down on the Latin and defined common (and some not-so-common) terms you can really use to understand and access the law.

Set aside those dusty, outdated law dictionaries! Written for the 21st century, this essential reference contains complete definitions of the legal terms you need today. If you're a law student, paralegal, accountant, small business owner or librarian -- anyone whose work or life touches the law -- this fully up-to-date A to Z guide puts access to the law into your hands.

Nolo's Plain-English Law Dictionary contains 3,800 plain-English legal definitions, including many newly coined terms you'll find online and off, such as "typosquatting" and "patent troll". Of course, if you need definitions for legal standards -- even when they're in Latin -- you'll find those here too. Plus, find a copy of the Constitution of the United States of America for your reference in the pages following the complete list of definitions.
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About the author

Gerald N. Hill has practiced law in San Francisco's financial district and a small town; has served as a pro tem judge, arbitrator, university law instructor, and executive director of a state agency; and has drafted legislation. He has a B.A. in political science from Stanford University and a J.D. from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law.

Kathleen Thompson Hill is a journalist and language analyst who writes a twice weekly newspaper column, was a Coro Fellow in Public Affairs, served on a grand jury, and chaired two municipal commissions. She earned a B.A. at the University of California, a degree from the Sorbonne, Paris, and an M.A. in political psychology from Sonoma State University.
Together, the Hills have coauthored 28 books, including The Encyclopedia of Federal Agencies and Commissions, The Facts on File Dictionary of American Politics, and The Real Life Dictionary of the Law. They have taught at the University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, and Sonoma State University, and were visiting scholars at the Institute of Governmental Studies at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Nolo
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Published on
May 11, 2009
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Pages
477
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ISBN
9781413315493
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Dictionaries & Terminology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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A comprehensive reference that includes a useful English-Latin law glossary and an extensive bibliography (centered on English-language publications) that covers all of the dictionary's topics. A formidable research tool. Originally published: Philadelphia: The American Philosophical Society, [1953] (Transactions of the American Philosophical Society; New Series, Volume 43, Part 2, 1953). [ii], 333-808 pp.

"This dictionary is intended to meet the needs of the student with little or no knowledge of Roman law or indeed of Latin. It seeks to provide a brief picture of Roman legal institutions and sources as a sort of first introduction to them. A very large number of brief-usually very brief-entries provide explanations of Roman legal terms, civil and criminal, and summary accounts of the sources. This is a formidable task to undertake single-handed, and Dr. Berger is to be congratulated on the great learning and thoroughness with which he has carried it through. ... The work ends with a remarkable general bibliography listing some fifteen hundred works under headings ranging from the main divisions of the law to 'Christianity and Roman Law' and 'Roman law in non-juristic sources.' This last is particularly valuable."--BARRY NICHOLAS 44 Journal of Roman Studies 160 (1954)

"The publication of Mr. Adolf Berger's encyclopedic dictionary of Roman law is a very important accomplishment in the recent history of American legal scholarship. The American legal world owes him homage for putting at its disposal the scholarship of twentieth-century European Romanism, or indicating the entrances thereto." --MITCHELL FRANKLIN 28 Tulane Law Review 412 (1953-1954)

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