Spaniards and Nazi Germany: Collaboration in the New Order

University of Missouri Press
Free sample

Only the indecisiveness of Spanish dictator Franco and diplomatic mistakes by the Nazis, argues Bowed (history, Ouachita Baptist U., Arkadelphia, Arkansas) prevented the Nazi supporters in the Spanish fascist party from bringing Spain into World War II on the side of the Axis. Still, he points out, Spaniards helped Germany by serving in its armies, working in its factories, and promoting its ideas to other nations. The study began as a doctoral dissertation for Northwestern University. Annotation copyrighted by Book News Inc., Portland, OR
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Missouri Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2000
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Pages
250
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ISBN
9780826262820
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / Germany
History / Europe / Spain & Portugal
History / Military / World War II
Political Science / International Relations / General
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Fascism & Totalitarianism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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