Benefit System Requirements: Checklist for Reviewing Systems Under the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act

DIANE Publishing
Free sample

The Fed. Financial Mgmt. Improvement Act of 1996 (FFMIA) requires, among other things, that agencies implement & maintain financial management systems (FMS) that substantially comply with federal FMS requirements. These requirements: promote understanding of key financial management systems concepts & requirements; provide a framework for establishing integrated financial management systems to support program & financial managers; & describe specific requirements of financial management systems. This checklist will assist: agencies in implementing & monitoring their benefit systems; & managers & auditors in reviewing their benefit systems to determine if they substantially comply with FFMIA.
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Additional Information

Publisher
DIANE Publishing
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Published on
Jun 30, 2003
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Pages
115
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ISBN
9780756734251
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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