The French North African Crisis: Colonial Breakdown and Anglo-French Relations, 1945–62

Springer
Free sample

The French North African Crisis analyses the postwar breakdown in French imperial rule in North West Africa, concentrating primarily upon the Algerian war of independence. The book highlights the human tragedy involved and the divisive consequences within French metropolitan politics of intractable colonial conflict. It further examines how far the protracted crisis of colonial control in North Africa shaped French foreign and security policy and this impacted upon Anglo-French relations, the western alliance and the wider process of decolonization.
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About the author

MARTIN THOMAS is Reader in International History at the University of the West of England. His previous books are Britain, France and Appeasement: Anglo-French Relations in the Popular Front Era (1996) and The French Empire at War, 1940-45 (1998).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Sep 8, 2000
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Pages
287
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ISBN
9780230287426
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Africa / General
History / Europe / France
History / Europe / General
History / Europe / Great Britain / General
History / General
Political Science / Colonialism & Post-Colonialism
Political Science / Security (National & International)
Technology & Engineering / Military Science
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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