Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2000

Lentz’s Performing Arts Obituaries

Book 7
McFarland
Free sample

From German actress Inga Abel (May 27, 2000) to Italian film producer Italo Zingarelli (April 29, 2000), the obituaries of 571 actors and actresses, comedians, dancers, choregraphers, producers, directors, writers, cartoonists, sports figures who became performers, and many others—from the fields of film, television, radio, theatre, music, dance, and all other branches of the performing arts who died in 2000 can be found. Each entry includes the date, place and cause of death, along with a brief summary of the individual’s career and citations to major newspaper and periodical stories reporting the death. Filmographies are given for film and television performers. There are 424 photographs accompanying the entries. Individual books in this annual series are available dating back to 1994. Subscription plan available for future issues.
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About the author

Harris M. Lentz III, independent scholar and prodigious researcher, is the author of numerous reference works. He lives in Horseshoe Lake, Arkansas.
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Additional Information

Publisher
McFarland
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Published on
Oct 24, 2008
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9780786452057
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Performing Arts / General
Reference / General
Social Science / Death & Dying
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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