Doing Justice without the State: The Afikpo (Ehugbo) Nigeria Model

Routledge
Free sample

This study examines the principles and practices of the Afikpo (Eugbo) Nigeria indigenous justice system in contemporary times. Like most African societies, the Afikpo indigenous justice system employs restorative, transformative and communitarian principles in conflict resolution. This book describes the processes of community empowerment, participatory justice system and how regular institutions of society that provide education, social and economic support are also effective in early intervention in disputes and prevention of conflicts.
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About the author

O.Oko Elechi is Assistant Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Wisconsin--Parkside. His research has been published extensively in international publications, including the International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice; The International Review of Victimology; Community Safety Journal and the Journal of Criminal Justice Education.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Jul 25, 2006
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Pages
260
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ISBN
9781135512521
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / International
Political Science / General
Political Science / International Relations / General
Social Science / Regional Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Ten years ago, in the wake of massive crimes in central Africa and the Balkans, the first permanent international criminal court was established in The Hague despite resistance from some of the world's most powerful states. In the past decade, the court has grown from a few staff in an empty building to a bustling institution with more than a thousand lawyers, investigators, and administrators from around the world. Despite its growth and the backing of more than 120 nations, the ICC is still struggling to assert itself in often turbulent political crises. The ICC is generally autonomous in its ability to select cases and investigate crimes, but it is ultimately dependent on sovereign states, and particularly on the world's leading powers. These states can provide the diplomatic, economic, and military clout the court often needs to get cooperation-and to arrest suspects. But states don't expend precious political capital lightly, and the court has often struggled to get the help it needs. When their interests are most affected, moreover, powerful states usually want the court to keep its distance. Directly and indirectly, they make their preferences known in The Hague. Rough Justice grapples with the court's basic dilemma: designed to be apolitical, it requires the support of politicians who pursue national interests and answer to domestic audiences. Through a sharp analysis of the dynamics at work behind the scenes, Bosco assesses the ways in which powerful states have shaped the court's effort to transform the vision of international justice into reality. This will be the definitive account of the Court and its uneven progress toward advancing accountability around the world.
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