Harvard Law Review: Volume 130, Number 5 - March 2017

Quid Pro Books
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The Harvard Law Review's March 2017 issue, Number 5, features these contents: 

• Article, "On the Relevance of Market Power," by Louis Kaplow 

• Book Review, "Spiraling: Evictions and Other Causes and Consequences of Housing Instability," by Vicki Been and Leila Bozorg (reviewing Matthew Desmond's Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

• Note, "Rights in Flux: Nonconsequentialism, Consequentialism, and the Judicial Role" 

• Note, "The Misguided Appeal of a Minimally Adequate Education" 
Furthermore, student commentary analyzes Recent Cases on: separation of powers and the appointments clause; personal jurisdiction in anti-terrorism act cases arising on foreign soil; deference to agency interpretations in conflict with circuit precedent; judicial review of zoning in light of DC's comprehensive plan; use of algorithmic risk assessments in sentencing; whether mother's debt for juvenile-detention costs of minor is dischargeable in bankruptcy; and whether ERISA preempt Michigan's Medicaid tax law. Finally, the issue includes two summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This is the fifth issue of academic year 2016-2017.

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About the author

Principal articles and essays in the Harvard Law Review are written by internationally recognized legal scholars. Moreover, student editors contribute substantial research in the form of Notes, recent case commentaries, and recent publication summaries. 

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Publisher
Quid Pro Books
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Published on
Mar 9, 2017
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Pages
241
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ISBN
9781610277839
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Antitrust
Law / Educational Law & Legislation
Law / Housing & Urban Development
Law / Jurisprudence
Law / Landlord & Tenant
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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The November issue is the special annual review of the U.S. Supreme Court's previous Term. The issue also includes an In Memoriam section honoring the memory of Justice Antonin Scalia. Contributors include Chief Justice John Roberts, Jr. and Associate Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan, as well as Cass Sunstein, Martha Minow, John Manning, and Rachel Barkow. 

Each year, the Supreme Court issue is introduced by noteworthy and extensive contributions from recognized scholars. In this issue, for the 2015 Term, articles and essays include:  

• Foreword: “Looking for Power in Public Law,” by Daryl J. Levinson 

• Essay: “The Age of Scalia,” by Jamal Greene 

• Comment: “Fisher’s Cautionary Tale and the Urgent Need for Equal Access to an Excellent Education,” by Kimberly Jenkins Robinson    

• Comment: “Gridlock,” by Josh Blackman   

In addition, the first issue of each new volume provides an extensive summary of the important cases of the previous Supreme Court docket, covering a wide range of legal, political, and constitutional subjects. Student commentary is thus provided on Leading Cases of the 2015 Term, including such subjects as separation of powers, freedom of speech, exclusionary rule, right to counsel, equal protection, jurisdiction, mandatory arbitration, abortion rights, corruption statutes, immigration law, and Title VII. Complete statistical graphs and tables of the Court's actions and results during the Term are included; these summaries and statistics, including voting patterns of individual Justices, have long been considered very useful to scholars of the Court in law and political science. The issue includes a linked Index of Cases and citations for the discussed opinions. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is November 2016, the first issue of academic year 2016-2017 (Volume 130). The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. 

Much has changed in the area of school law since the first edition of The Educator's Guide was published in 1986. Successive editions grew incrementally longer to keep abreast of legal developments. In this new eighth edition, the authors have streamlined the discussion by pruning older material and weaving in new developments. The result is an authoritative source on all major dimensions of Texas school law that is both well integrated and easy to read.

Intended for Texas school personnel, school board members, interested attorneys, and taxpayers, the eighth edition explains what the law is and what the implications are for effective school operations. It is designed to help professional educators avoid expensive and time consuming lawsuits by taking effective preventive action. It is an especially valuable resource for school law courses and staff development sessions.

The eighth edition begins with a review of the legal structure of the Texas school system. As Chapter 1 notes, education law is a complex interweaving of state and federal constitutional, statutory, administrative, and judicial law. It is important to understand the nature of the system before reading other sections.

Successive chapters address attendance and the instructional program, the education of children with special needs, employment and personnel, expression and associational rights, the role of religion in public schools, student discipline, open meetings and records, privacy, search and seizure, and legal liability under both federal and Texas law. In addition to state law, the book addresses the role of the federal government in school operation through such major federal legislation as the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

Statute and case references are kept as simple as possible, and a complete index of case citations is included for those readers who wish to consult the cases themselves. The appendices describe how case law is reported and where to find it, along with a glossary of legal terms and a listing of other sources on Texas school law.

The Harvard Law Review, April 2015, is offered in a digital edition. Contents include the annual Developments in the Law survey of a particular area of legal concern; this year's topic is Policing. Other contents include: 

• Article, "Consent Procedures and American Federalism," by Bridget Fahey      

• Essay, "Anticipatory Remedies for Takings," by Thomas W. Merrill   

• Book Review, "How a 'Lawless' China Made Modern America: An Epic Told in Orientalism," by Carol G.S. Tan 

Specific subjects studied in Developments in the Law—Policing are: Policing and Profit, Policing Students, Policing Immigrant Communities, and Considering Police Body Cameras. 

In addition, the issue features student commentary on Recent Cases, including such subjects as: the business judgment rule and mergers; whistleblowing under Dodd-Frank and extraterritoriality; senate redistricting in New York; postmortem rights of publicity; standing and overlap of various tests used; informing one who pleads No Contest of collateral consequences; exceptions to New York marriage license requirement for out-of-state marriages; exclusionary rule for violations of Posse Comitatus restrictions; and extending federal forced labor statute to conduct criminalized under state law. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. The Review comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. The organization is formally independent of the Harvard Law School. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions. This issue of the Review is Apr. 2015, the 6th issue of academic year 2014-2015 (Volume 128). The digital edition features active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. 

The November issue is the special annual review of the U.S. Supreme Court's previous Term. Each year, the issue is introduced by noteworthy and extensive contributions from recognized scholars. In this issue, for the 2012 Term, articles and essays include:

• Foreword: "Equality Divided," by Reva B. Siegel
• Comment: "Beyond the Discrimination Model on Voting," by Samuel Issacharoff 
• Comment: "Windsor and Brown: Marriage Equality and Racial Equality," by Michael J. Klarman  
• Comment: "License, Registration, Cheek Swab: DNA Testing and the Divided Court," by Erin Murphy 

The issue also features essays on substantive and procedural law, and judicial method, honoring Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her 20 years on the Court. The essays are written by such scholars as Deborah Anker, Susan Farbstein, Judge Nancy Gertner, Lani Guinier, Vicki Jackson, Richard Lazarus, John Manning, Martha Minow, Carol Steiker, Julie Suk, Laurence Tribe, and Mark Tushnet. 

In addition, the first issue of each new volume provides an extensive summary of the important cases of the previous Supreme Court docket, covering a wide range of legal, political and constitutional subjects. Student commentary on Leading Cases of the 2012 Term includes recent cases on: federal preemption regarding elections; the Privileges and Immunities Clause; unconstitutional conditions violating free speech; effective assistance of counsel; dog-sniffing at the doorstep under the Fourth Amendment; jury trial right for mandatory sentencing; affirmative action in public universities; class action certification in securities cases; class action waivers in arbitration clauses; plain error review when new law is made after appeal; standing in government surveillance challenges; extraterritoriality under the Alien Tort Statute; actual innocence under AEDPA; deference to agencies in clean water and communication act cases; the First Sale Doctrine in copyright law; patent exhaustion; patentable subject matter; reverse payment settlements; Indian adoptions; and employer liability for supervisor harassment under Title VII. Complete statistical graphs and tables of the Court's actions and results during the Term are included. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications.

The contents for the February 2018 issue (Number 4) include: 

• Article, “Are We Running out of Trademarks? An Empirical Study of Trademark Depletion and Congestion,” by Barton Beebe & Jeanne C. Fromer 

• Article, “Agency Fees and the First Amendment,” by Benjamin I. Sachs  

• Book Review, “Unsettling History,” by Jennifer M. Chacón 

• Note, “Bail Reform and Risk Assessment: The Cautionary Tale of Federal Sentencing” 

In addition, the issue includes several commentaries on Recent Cases, analyzing such subjects as: political rights and nonapportionment in Puerto Rico; asserting conspiracy-of-silence claim when prevented from witnessing a search; constitutionality of routine shackling in pretrial proceedings; sovereign immunity as applied to Ethiopia in hacking suit; harms-of-abatement doctrine and due process; and whether aggregate term-of-years sentences implicate Eighth Amendment restrictions on juvenile life without parole. Finally the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs, legible tables, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting. This current issue of the Review is February 2018, the 4th issue of academic year 2017-2018 (Volume 131). The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. It comes out monthly from November through June and has roughly 2500 pages per volume. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions.

The February 2014 issue (Volume 127, Number 4) features the following articles and essays: 

* Article, "Partisan Federalism," by Jessica Bulman-Pozen 

* Book Review, "Never Mind the Constitution," by Jeremy Waldron 

* Note, "NFIB v. Sebelius and the Individualization of the State Action Doctrine" 

In addition, student case notes explore Recent Cases on such diverse subjects as FDA limits on Plan B contraception, local zoning bans on medical marijuana sellers, a First Amendment defense to right-of-publicity claims, warrantless searches of cell-site data, copyright fair use and transformative artwork, undocumented alien workers as barred from backpay under labor law, international law and jurisdiction over a facilitator of piracy, juvenile life without parole and retroactivity, whether an unaccepted Rule 68 offer moots a plaintiff's individual claims, whether a private equity fund is a "trade or business" in pension law, and whether a mentally ill prisoner is competent to be executed. Finally, the issue includes two summaries of Recent Publications. 

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a quality digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked notes, active URLs in notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Number 4 (Feb. 2014) include scholarly essays by leading academic figures, as well as substantial student research. The Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a journal of legal scholarship. The organization is formally independent of the Harvard Law School. Student editors make all editorial and organizational decisions.

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