Applied Econometrics Using the SAS System

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The first cutting-edge guide to using the SAS® system for the analysis of econometric data

Applied Econometrics Using the SAS® System is the first book of its kind to treat the analysis of basic econometric data using SAS®, one of the most commonly used software tools among today's statisticians in business and industry. This book thoroughly examines econometric methods and discusses how data collected in economic studies can easily be analyzed using the SAS® system.

In addition to addressing the computational aspects of econometric data analysis, the author provides a statistical foundation by introducing the underlying theory behind each method before delving into the related SAS® routines. The book begins with a basic introduction to econometrics and the relationship between classical regression analysis models and econometric models. Subsequent chapters balance essential concepts with SAS® tools and cover key topics such as:

  • Regression analysis using Proc IML and Proc Reg

  • Hypothesis testing

  • Instrumental variables analysis, with a discussion of measurement errors, the assumptions incorporated into the analysis, and specification tests 

  • Heteroscedasticity, including GLS and FGLS estimation, group-wise heteroscedasticity, and GARCH models

  • Panel data analysis

  • Discrete choice models, along with coverage of binary choice models and Poisson regression

  • Duration analysis models

Assuming only a working knowledge of SAS®, this book is a one-stop reference for using the software to analyze econometric data. Additional features include complete SAS® code, Proc IML routines plus a tutorial on Proc IML, and an appendix with additional programs and data sets. Applied Econometrics Using the SAS® System serves as a relevant and valuable reference for practitioners in the fields of business, economics, and finance. In addition, most students of econometrics are taught using GAUSS and STATA, yet SAS® is the standard in the working world; therefore, this book is an ideal supplement for upper-undergraduate and graduate courses in statistics, economics, and other social sciences since it prepares readers for real-world careers.

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About the author

Vivek B. Ajmani, PhD, is Senior Marketing Analyst at U.S. Bank in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he applies econometric modeling, data mining, and predictive modeling techniques to his work with innovative banking products and solutions. Dr. Ajmani has also held positions at Ameriprise Financial, General Mills, Intel Corporation, and the 3M Company, and he has received honors for his use of statistics in the development of quality products.
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Additional Information

John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Sep 20, 2011
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Business & Economics / Economics / General
Mathematics / Probability & Statistics / General
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This content is DRM protected.
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