Shivers: 13 Tales of Terror

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Spooks, werewolves and demons haunt these 13 tales that will leave you shuddering with fright!


Enjoy the spine tingles as you read a cautionary tale about not playing with any old deck of cards, however innocent they may seem. Wallow in the horror of a she-demon stalking her victims, or a werewolf discovering there are things weirder than himself. Or maybe you'd like to chuckle at the chill on the back of your neck as you spend time with a hair-raising highwayman.


13 tales of terror. 13 scares. Read them - we dare you.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Wittegen Press
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Pages
305
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ISBN
9781912583119
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Horror
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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