Nationalism, Globalization, and Orthodoxy

Contributions in Military Studies

Book 89
Greenwood Publishing Group
Free sample

Roudometof provides an in-depth sociological analysis of the birth and historical evolution of nationalism in the Balkans. The rise of nationalism in the region is viewed as part of a world-historical process of globalization over the last five centuries. With the growing contacts between the Ottoman Empire and the Western European system, the Eastern Orthodox of the Balkans abandoned the enthoconfessional system of social organization in favor of secular national identities.

Prior to 1820, local nationalism was influenced by the Enlightenment, though later it came to be developed on an ethnonational basis. In the post-1830 Balkans, citizenship rights were subordinated to ethnic nationalism, according to which membership to a nation is accorded on the basis of church affiliation and ethnicity. In the 19th and 20th centuries, the discourse of nationhood was institutionalized by the native intelligentsia of the Balkan states. In the first half of the 20th century, the efforts of Balkan states to achieve national homogenization produced interstate rivalry, forced population exchanges, and discrimination against minority groups. While the Cold War helped contain some of these problems, the post-1989 period has seen a return of these issues to the forefront of the Balkan political agenda.

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About the author

VICTOR ROUDOMETOF is Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Washington and Lee University in Virginia./e He has published widely on globalization, nationalism, and national minorities in the Balkans. He is the editor of The Macedonian Question: Culture, Historiography, Politics (2000), American Culture in Europe: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Praeger, 1998), and co-editor of The New Balkans.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Greenwood Publishing Group
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Published on
Dec 31, 2001
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9780313319495
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / General
Political Science / International Relations / General
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Nationalism & Patriotism
Political Science / Political Process / General
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This book was published as a special issue of Third World Quarterly.

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