Composing Capital: Classical Music in the Neoliberal Era

University of Chicago Press
Free sample

The familiar old world of classical music, with its wealthy donors and ornate concert halls, is changing. The patronage of a wealthy few is being replaced by that of corporations, leading to new unions of classical music and contemporary capitalism. In Composing Capital, Marianna Ritchey lays bare the appropriation of classical music by the current neoliberal regime, arguing that artists, critics, and institutions have aligned themselves—and, by extension, classical music itself—with free-market ideology. More specifically, she demonstrates how classical music has lent its cachet to marketing schemes, tech firm-sponsored performances, and global corporate partnerships. As Ritchey shows, the neoliberalization of classical music has put music at the service of contemporary capitalism, blurring the line between creativity and entrepreneurship, and challenging us to imagine how a noncommodified musical practice might be possible in today’s world.
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About the author

Marianna Ritchey is assistant professor of music history at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Aug 5, 2019
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Pages
216
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ISBN
9780226640372
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Language
English
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Genres
Music / General
Music / Genres & Styles / Classical
Music / History & Criticism
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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A Juilliard-trained musician and professor of history explores the fascinating entanglement of classical music with American foreign relations.

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Rich with a stunning array of composers and musicians, including Karl Muck, Arturo Toscanini, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Kirsten Flagstad, Aaron Copland, Van Cliburn, and Leonard Bernstein, Dangerous Melodies delves into the volatile intersection of classical music and world politics to reveal a tumultuous history of twentieth-century America.

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