Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold

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“A lovely, fascinating book, which brings science to life.” —Alan Lightman

Combining science, history, and adventure, Tom Shachtman “holds the reader’s attention with the skill of a novelist” as he chronicles the story of humans’ four-centuries-long quest to master the secrets of cold (Scientific American).
 
“A disarming portrait of an exquisite, ferocious, world-ending extreme,” Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold demonstrates how temperature science produced astonishing scientific insights and applications that have revolutionized civilization (Kirkus Reviews). It also illustrates how scientific advancement, fueled by fortuitous discoveries and the efforts of determined individuals, has allowed people to adapt to—and change—the environments in which they live and work, shaping man’s very understanding of, and relationship, with the world.
 
This “truly wonderful book” was adapted into an acclaimed documentary underwritten by the National Science Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, directed by British Emmy Award winner David Dugan, and aired on the BBC and PBS’s Nova in 2008 (Library Journal).
 
“An absorbing account to chill out with.” —Booklist
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About the author

Tom Shachtman has written twenty-eight nonfiction books, including the acclaimed Around the Block and Skyscraper Dreams. He has also written documentary films and tapes, which have won many awards. Shachtman lives with his wife in New York City.
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Additional Information

Publisher
HMH
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Published on
Dec 12, 2000
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9780547525952
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Earth Sciences / Meteorology & Climatology
Science / History
Science / Mechanics / Thermodynamics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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