The Worlds of the Seventeenth-Century Hudson Valley

SUNY Press
Free sample

Essays by eleven prominent scholars provide the latest insights into the seventeenth-century history of the Hudson Valley and its environs.

This book provides an in-depth introduction to the issues involved in the expansion of European interests to the Hudson River Valley, the cultural interaction that took place there, and the colonization of the region. Written in accessible language by leading scholars, these essays incorporate the latest historical insights as they explore the new world in which American Indians and Europeans interacted, the settlement of the Dutch colony that ensued from the exploration of the Hudson River, and the development of imperial and other networks which came to incorporate the Hudson Valley.

“This well-conceived volume illuminates the various contexts of life in the seventeenth-century Hudson Valley. Both laymen and specialists will gain new insights from the twelve essays, which reveal everything from the European background of tolerance and inter-imperial strife to the significance of wampum and the role of a Native model of inter-group relations that shaped Iroquois ties with the Dutch.” — Willem Klooster, author of Revolutions in the Atlantic World: A Comparative History

“A perfect tribute to the Hudson Valley’s unique history and how it changed forever in the decades following Henry Hudson’s 1609 voyage! The essays in this rich collection capture the complex, interconnected world experienced by those who lived in the Hudson River Valley in the seventeenth century, a place at the crossroads of four continents, an area contested by three emerging empires, a valley where Munsee, Mahican, and Mohawk interacted with European cultures. Both professional historians and those new to the field will be intrigued by the wide variety of topics. This collection by an esteemed group of historians makes an outstanding contribution to both New Netherland and Atlantic history.” — Dennis J. Maika, New Netherland Institute
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About the author

Jaap Jacobs is Honorary Lecturer at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland and the author of many books, including The Colony of New Netherland: A Dutch Settlement in Seventeenth-Century America. L. H. Roper is Professor of History at the State University of New York at New Paltz. His books include The English Empire in America, 1602–1658: Beyond Jamestown.
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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
May 15, 2014
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Pages
278
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ISBN
9781438450995
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Modern / 17th Century
History / Native American
History / United States / Colonial Period (1600-1775)
History / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, NY, PA)
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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