Psychology of Academic Cheating

Elsevier
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Who cheats and why? How do they cheat? What are the consequences? What are the ways of stopping it before it starts? These questions and more are answered in this research based investigation into the nature and circumstances of Academic Cheating. Cheating has always been a problem in academic settings, and with advances in technology (camera cell phones, the internet) and more pressure than ever for students to test well and get into top rated schools, cheating has become epidemic. At the same time, it has been argued, the moral fiber of society as a whole has dampened to find cheating less villainous than it was once regarded. Who cheats? Why do they cheat? and Under what circumstances?

Psychology of Academic Cheating looks at personality variables of those likely to cheat, but also the circumstances that make one more likely than not to try cheating. Research on the motivational aspects of cheating, and what research has shown to prevent cheating is discussed across different student populations, ages and settings.

  • Summarizes 50 years of academic cheating trends in K-12 and postsecondary institutions
  • Examines the methodology of academic cheating including the effect of new technologies
  • Reviews and discusses existing theories and research about the motivation behind academic cheating
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Additional Information

Publisher
Elsevier
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Published on
Apr 28, 2011
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Pages
352
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ISBN
9780080466491
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Educational Psychology
Psychology / Developmental / Child
Psychology / Developmental / General
Psychology / Neuropsychology
Psychology / Physiological Psychology
Science / Life Sciences / Neuroscience
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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