Democratizing the European Union: Issues for the Twenty-first Century

Transaction Publishers
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The European Union's "democratic deficit" and ways that might be found to resolve it are hot issues in both academic debate and practical politics. Democratizing the European Union offers a fresh approach to this subject by bringing together a diverse range of authors who have been actively involved either in analyzing the activities of the European Union or participating in them.

The contributors go beyond a primarily institutional approach by highlighting issues having to do with values, participation, and exclusion. Collectively this volume also transcends the limitations of abstract theory. Embracing a range of perspectives, and including discussions of major contemporary challenges, such as enlargement and economic and monetary union, this book contains a detailed analysis of the response of New Labour to the democratization debate. The contributions include: Sue Cohen, "Social Solidarity in the Delors Period"; Sverker Gustavsson, "Reconciling Suprastatism and Accountability: A View from Sweden"; Stefano Fella, "A Europe of the Peoples? New Labour and Democratizing the EU"; John Lambert and Catherine Hoskyns, "How Democratic is the European Parliament?"; Valerio Lintner, "Controlling Monetary Union"; Mary Kaldor, "Eastern Enlargement and Democracy"; Richard Kuper, "Democratization: A Constitutionalizing Process"; and Catherine Hoskyns, "Democratizing the EU: Evidence and Argument."

Democratizing the European Union is essential reading for all those with an interest in the EU and broader questions of democracy. It is also particularly useful for students of European Studies and practitioners involved in EU policymaking and lobbying.

Catherine Hoskyns is Jean Monnet Professor of European Studies at Coventry University. She is the author of Integrating Gender: Women, Law and Politics in the European Union, and her articles have appeared in the European Journal of Women's Studies and Women's Philosophy Review.

Michael Newman is Jean Monnet Professor of European Integration Studies and a professor of politics at the University of North London. He is the author of Democracy, Sovereignty and the European Union, Harold Laski: A Political Biography, and Socialism and European Unity.

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Publisher
Transaction Publishers
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Pages
212
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ISBN
9781412821582
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / International Relations / General
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Democracy
Political Science / Political Process / General
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This content is DRM protected.
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The real collusion in the 2016 election was not between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin. It was between the Clinton campaign and the Obama administration.

The media–Democrat “collusion narrative,” which paints Donald Trump as cat’s paw of Russia, is a studiously crafted illusion.

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Miraculously, Trump won anyway. But his political opponents refused to accept the voters’ decision. Their collusion narrative was now peddled relentlessly by political operatives, intelligence agents, Justice Department officials, and media ideologues—the vanguard of the “Trump Resistance.” Through secret surveillance, high-level intelligence leaking, and tireless news coverage, the public was led to believe that Trump conspired with Russia to steal the election.

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They failed to forge a new Clinton administration. Will they succeed in bringing down President Trump?
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