Help (Not) Wanted: Immigration Politics in Japan

SUNY Press
Free sample

Shows how Japan’s immigration policy is shaped by the nature of Japan’s economy and elite debates about the country’s national identity.


In Help (Not) Wanted, Michael Strausz offers an original and provocative answer to a question that has long perplexed observers of Japan: Why has Japan’s immigration policy remained so restrictive, especially in light of economic, demographic, and international political forces that are pushing Japan to admit more immigrants? Drawing upon insights developed during nearly two years of intensive field research in Japan, Strausz ultimately argues that Japan’s immigration policy has remained restrictive for two reasons. First, Japan’s labor-intensive businesses have failed to defeat anti-immigration forces within the Japanese state, particularly those in the Ministry of Justice and the Japanese Diet. Second, no influential strain of elite thought in postwar Japan exists to support the idea that significant numbers of foreign nationals have a legitimate claim to residency and citizenship. This book is particularly timely at a moment shaped by Brexit, the election of Trump, and the rise of anti-immigrant political parties and nativist rhetoric across the globe.

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About the author

Michael Strausz is Associate Professor of Political Science at Texas Christian University.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Aug 1, 2019
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Pages
214
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ISBN
9781438475530
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Emigration & Immigration
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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