Granny D: Walking Across America in My Ninetieth Year

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"There's a cancer, and it's killing our democracy. A poor man has to sell his soul to get elected. I cry for this country."

On February 29, 2000, ninety-year-old Doris “Granny D” Haddock completed her 3,200-mile, fourteen-month walk from Los Angeles to Washington D.C. She walked through 105-degree deserts and blinding blizzards, despite arthritis and emphysema. Along her way, her remarkable speeches — rich with wisdom, love, and political insight — transformed individuals and communities and jump-started a full-blown movement. She became a national heroine.

On her journey, Haddock kept a diary — tracking the progress of her walk and recalling events in her life and the insights that have given her. Granny D celebrates an exuberant life of love, activism, and adventure — from writing one-woman feminist plays in the 1930s to stopping nuclear testing near an Eskimo fishing village in 1960 to Haddock’s current crusade. Threaded throughout is the spirit of her beloved hometown of Dublin/Peterborough, New Hampshire — Thornton Wilder’s inspirations for Grovers Croner in Out Town — a quintessentially American center of New England pluck, Yankee ingenuity and can-do attitude.

Told in Doris Haddock’s distinct and unforgettable voice, Granny D will move, amuse, and inspire readers of all ages with its clarion message that one person can indeed make a difference.
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About the author

Doris Haddock is a retired executive secretary and great-grandmother of twelve. She lives in Dublin, New Hampshire. Government reformer Dennis Burke accompanied Doris Haddock on her walk. He lives in Phoenix, Arizona.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Villard
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Published on
Jun 12, 2001
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9780375506758
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Women
Political Science / Women in Politics
Social Science / Feminism & Feminist Theory
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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