On Shifting Ground: Muslim Women in the Global Era

The Feminist Press at CUNY
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“Thoughtful, highly relevant, and frequently brilliant essays on the contemporary ideas, organization, activities, and agency of Muslim women” (Nikki Keddie, author of Women in the Middle East: Past and Present).
 
The world has drastically changed in recent years due to armed conflict, economic issues, and cultural revolutions both positive and negative. Nowhere have those changes been felt more than in the Middle East and Muslim worlds. And no one within those worlds has been more affected than women, who face new and vital questions.
 
Has Arab Spring made life better for Muslim women? Has new media empowered feminists or is it simply a tool of the opposition? Will the newfound freedoms of Middle Eastern women grow or be taken away by yet more oppressive regimes?
 
This “provocative volume” has been updated with a new introduction and two new essays, offering insider views on how Muslim women are navigating technology, social media, public space, the tension between secularism and fundamentalism, and the benefits and responsibilities of citizenship (Nikki Keddie, Professor Emerita of Middle Eastern and Iranian History, UCLA).
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About the author

Fereshteh Nouraie-Simone is a historian at the American University School of International Service. She teaches courses on gender and social change in the Middle East, Iran, and the history of US-Iran relations.
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Additional Information

Publisher
The Feminist Press at CUNY
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Published on
Sep 15, 2014
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Pages
344
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ISBN
9781558618565
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Islam / General
Social Science / Essays
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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