The Mid Tudors: Edward VI and Mary, 1547–1558

Routledge
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Covering the period from 1547 to 1558, The Mid Tudors explores the reigns of Edward VI and Mary. Stephen J. Lee examines all the key issues debated by historians, including the question as to whether there was a mid-Tudor crisis. Using a wide variety of sources and historiography, Lee also looks at the Reformation and the Counter Reformation, as well as discussing government and foreign policy. The book starts with a chapter on Henry VIII to establish the overall perspective over the following two reigns – thereby providing a basis to examine their positive as well as negative features.

Including both a chronology and glossary of key terms, this essential A Level book provides a vital resource for all students of this fascinating period of British history.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Sep 27, 2006
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Pages
168
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ISBN
9781134415830
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / General
History / Europe / Great Britain / General
History / General
History / Modern / 18th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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