Quantitative Social Science: An Introduction

Princeton University Press
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An introductory textbook on data analysis and statistics written especially for students in the social sciences and allied fields

Quantitative analysis is an increasingly essential skill for social science research, yet students in the social sciences and related areas typically receive little training in it—or if they do, they usually end up in statistics classes that offer few insights into their field. This textbook is a practical introduction to data analysis and statistics written especially for undergraduates and beginning graduate students in the social sciences and allied fields, such as economics, sociology, public policy, and data science.

Quantitative Social Science engages directly with empirical analysis, showing students how to analyze data using the R programming language and to interpret the results—it encourages hands-on learning, not paper-and-pencil statistics. More than forty data sets taken directly from leading quantitative social science research illustrate how data analysis can be used to answer important questions about society and human behavior.

Proven in the classroom, this one-of-a-kind textbook features numerous additional data analysis exercises and interactive R programming exercises, and also comes with supplementary teaching materials for instructors.

  • Written especially for students in the social sciences and allied fields, including economics, sociology, public policy, and data science
  • Provides hands-on instruction using R programming, not paper-and-pencil statistics
  • Includes more than forty data sets from actual research for students to test their skills on
  • Covers data analysis concepts such as causality, measurement, and prediction, as well as probability and statistical tools
  • Features a wealth of supplementary exercises, including additional data analysis exercises and interactive programming exercises
  • Offers a solid foundation for further study
  • Comes with additional course materials online, including notes, sample code, exercises and problem sets with solutions, and lecture slides
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About the author

Kosuke Imai is professor of politics and founding director of the Program in Statistics and Machine Learning at Princeton University.
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Additional Information

Princeton University Press
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Published on
Feb 27, 2017
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Best For
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Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / General
Political Science / General
Political Science / History & Theory
Social Science / Methodology
Social Science / Reference
Social Science / Research
Social Science / Statistics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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From the 1980s through the first decade of the twenty-first century, the spread of democracy across the developing and post-Communist worlds transformed the global political landscape. What drove these changes and what determined whether the emerging democracies would stabilize or revert to authoritarian rule? Dictators and Democrats takes a comprehensive look at the transitions to and from democracy in recent decades. Deploying both statistical and qualitative analysis, Stephen Haggard and Robert Kaufman engage with theories of democratic change and advocate approaches that emphasize political and institutional factors. While inequality has been a prominent explanation for democratic transitions, the authors argue that its role has been limited, and elites as well as masses can drive regime change.

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Between 1974 and 1990 more than thirty countries in southern Europe, Latin America, East Asia, and Eastern Europe shifted from authoritarian to democratic systems of government. This global democratic revolution is probably the most important political trend in the late twentieth century. In The Third Wave, Samuel P. Huntington analyzes the causes and nature of these democratic transitions, evaluates the prospects for stability of the new democracies, and explores the possibility of more countries becoming democratic. The recent transitions, he argues, are the third major wave of democratization in the modem world. Each of the two previous waves was followed by a reverse wave in which some countries shifted back to authoritarian government. Using concrete examples, empirical evidence, and insightful analysis, Huntington provides neither a theory nor a history of the third wave, but an explanation of why and how it occurred.

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Several "Guidelines for Democratizers" offer specific, practical suggestions for initiating and carrying out reform. Huntington's emphasis on practical application makes this book a valuable tool for anyone engaged in the democratization process. At this volatile time in history, Huntington's assessment of the processes of democratization is indispensable to understanding the future of democracy in the world.

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Highlights of the new third edition include:

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